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Title: Greenland Clouds Observed in CALIPSO -GOCCP: Comparison with Ground-Based Summit Observations

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6]
  1. Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique, Institut Pierre Simon Laplace École Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France
  2. Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Boulder, Colorado
  3. CNRS/INSU, Laboratoire d’Aérologie, Toulouse, France
  4. Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado
  5. NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Boulder, Colorado
  6. CNRS, Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique, Institut Pierre Simon Laplace Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1369332
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Climate
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 30; Journal Issue: 15; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-08-01 12:44:06; Journal ID: ISSN 0894-8755
Publisher:
American Meteorological Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Lacour, Adrien, Chepfer, Helene, Shupe, Matthew D., Miller, Nathaniel B., Noel, Vincent, Kay, Jennifer, Turner, David D., and Guzman, Rodrigo. Greenland Clouds Observed in CALIPSO -GOCCP: Comparison with Ground-Based Summit Observations. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-16-0552.1.
Lacour, Adrien, Chepfer, Helene, Shupe, Matthew D., Miller, Nathaniel B., Noel, Vincent, Kay, Jennifer, Turner, David D., & Guzman, Rodrigo. Greenland Clouds Observed in CALIPSO -GOCCP: Comparison with Ground-Based Summit Observations. United States. doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-16-0552.1.
Lacour, Adrien, Chepfer, Helene, Shupe, Matthew D., Miller, Nathaniel B., Noel, Vincent, Kay, Jennifer, Turner, David D., and Guzman, Rodrigo. Tue . "Greenland Clouds Observed in CALIPSO -GOCCP: Comparison with Ground-Based Summit Observations". United States. doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-16-0552.1.
@article{osti_1369332,
title = {Greenland Clouds Observed in CALIPSO -GOCCP: Comparison with Ground-Based Summit Observations},
author = {Lacour, Adrien and Chepfer, Helene and Shupe, Matthew D. and Miller, Nathaniel B. and Noel, Vincent and Kay, Jennifer and Turner, David D. and Guzman, Rodrigo},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1175/JCLI-D-16-0552.1},
journal = {Journal of Climate},
number = 15,
volume = 30,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 09 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue May 09 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on July 8, 2018
Publisher's Version of Record

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
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  • Statistics of ice cloud macrophysical and optical properties from the Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on board the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite are compared with those from ground-based lidar observations over a 31 month period. Ground-based lidar observations are taken from the micropulse lidars (MPL) at the three Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) tropical western pacific (TWP) sites: Manus, Nauru and Darwin. CALIPSO observations show a larger cloud fraction at high altitudes while the ground-based MPLs show a larger cloud fraction at low altitudes. The difference in mean ice cloud topmore » and base heights at the Manus and Nauru sites are all within 0.51 km, although differences are statistically significant. Mean ice cloud geometrical thickness agree to within 0.05 km at the Manus and Nauru sites. Larger differences exist at Darwin due to excessive degradation of the MPL output power during our sampling period. Both sets of observations show thicker clouds during the nighttime which may be real but could also be partially an artifact of the decreased signal-to-noise ratio during the daytime. The number of ice cloud layers per profile are also shown to be consistent after accounting for the difference in spatial resolution. For cloud optical depths, four different retrieval methods are compared, two for each set of observations. All products show that the majority of ice cloud optical depths ({approx}60%) fall below an optical depth of 0.2. For most comparisons all four retrievals agree to within the uncertainty intervals. We find that both CALIPSO retrievals agree best to ground-based optical depths when the lidar ratio in the latter is retrieved instead of set to a fixed value. Also thoroughly compared is the cloud properties for the subset of ice clouds which reside in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL).« less
  • Multi-instrument, ground-based measurements provide unique and comprehensive data sets of the atmosphere for a specific location over long periods of time and resulting data compliment past and existing global satellite observations. Our paper explores the effect of ice hydrometeors on ground-based, high-frequency passive microwave measurements and attempts to isolate an ice signature for summer seasons at Summit, Greenland, from 2010 to 2013. Furthermore, data from a combination of passive microwave, cloud radar, radiosonde, and ceilometer were examined to isolate the ice signature at microwave wavelengths. By limiting the study to a cloud liquid water path of 40 g m -2more » or less, the cloud radar can identify cases where the precipitation was dominated by ice. These cases were examined using liquid water and gas microwave absorption models, and brightness temperatures were calculated for the high-frequency microwave channels: 90, 150, and 225GHz. By comparing the measured brightness temperatures from the microwave radiometers and the calculated brightness temperature using only gas and liquid contributions, any residual brightness temperature difference is due to emission and scattering of microwave radiation from the ice hydrometeors in the column. The ice signature in the 90, 150, and 225 GHz channels for the Summit Station summer months was isolated. Then, this measured ice signature was compared to an equivalent brightness temperature difference calculated with a radiative transfer model including microwave single-scattering properties for several ice habits. Furthermore, initial model results compare well against the 4 years of summer season isolated ice signature in the high-frequency microwave channels.« less
  • Lidar observations of cirrus cloud macrophysical properties over the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program Darwin, Australia site are compared from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and In- frared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite, the ground-based ARM micropulse lidar (MPL), and the ARM Raman lidar (RL). Comparisons are made using the subset of profiles where the lidar beam is not fully attenuated. Daytime measurements using the RL are shown to be relatively unaffected by the solar background and are therefore suited for checking the validity of diurnal cycles. RL and CALIPSO cloud fraction profiles show good agreement while themore » MPL detects significantly less cirrus, particularly during the daytime. Both MPL and CALIPSO observations show that cirrus clouds occur less frequently during the day than at night at all altitudes. In contrast, the RL diurnal cy- cle is significantly different than zero only below about 11 km; where it is the opposite sign (i.e. more clouds during the daytime). For cirrus geomet- rical thickness, the MPL and CALIPSO observations agree well and both datasets have signficantly thinner clouds during the daytime than the RL. From the examination of hourly MPL and RL cirrus cloud thickness and through the application of daytime detection limits to all CALIPSO data we find that the decreased MPL and CALIPSO cloud thickness during the daytime is very likely a result of increased daytime noise. This study highlights the vast im- provement the RL provides (compared to the MPL) in the ARM program's ability to observe tropical cirrus clouds as well as a valuable ground-based lidar dataset for the validation of CALIPSO observations and to help im- prove our understanding of tropical cirrus clouds.« less
  • During December 1988, 24 hours of darkness and clear sky conditions permitted continuous observations of the O I (6300{Angstrom}) airglow by a Fabry-Perot interferometer located at Thule Air Base, Greenland. Thus a continuous record of the F region neutral winds was obtained for that month. During this same period, a digital ionosonde located at Qanaq, Greenland (110 km north of Thule Air Base), was in operation measuring electron density profiles and F region ion drifts. This combination of ground-based observations allowed the investigation of ion/neutral coupling at a temporal resolution of about 15 min. Interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) data frommore » the IMP 8 satellite were also available from December 16 to 24 and indicated intervals of B{sub z} northward IMF conditions during this period. Here the authors investigate the observed response of the neutral wind to convection changes in the ion drift inside the polar cap for southward and northward IMF B{sub z} conditions. In particular, they establish a control day illustrating the typical antisunward neutral wind and ion drift patterns observed for southward B{sub z} over Thule and Qanaq, and they compare it with observations made when the IMF B{sub z} is directed northward. The observations during periods of northward B{sub z} display sunward directed ion drifts over the polar cap accompanied by decreasing antisunward directed neutral winds. The authors investigate these times of northward B{sub z} further and demonstrate that the ion drag term alone cannot describe the observed response in the neutral wind during northward IMF. 26 refs., 5 figs.« less
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