skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: IoGET: Internet of Geophysical and Environmental Things

Abstract

The objective of this project is to provide novel and fast reduced-order models for onboard computation at sensor nodes for real-time analysis. The approach will require that LANL perform high-fidelity numerical simulations, construct simple reduced-order models (ROMs) using machine learning and signal processing algorithms, and use real-time data analysis for ROMs and compressive sensing at sensor nodes.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1369163
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-25560
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; 58 GEOSCIENCES

Citation Formats

Mudunuru, Maruti Kumar. IoGET: Internet of Geophysical and Environmental Things. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1369163.
Mudunuru, Maruti Kumar. IoGET: Internet of Geophysical and Environmental Things. United States. doi:10.2172/1369163.
Mudunuru, Maruti Kumar. 2017. "IoGET: Internet of Geophysical and Environmental Things". United States. doi:10.2172/1369163. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1369163.
@article{osti_1369163,
title = {IoGET: Internet of Geophysical and Environmental Things},
author = {Mudunuru, Maruti Kumar},
abstractNote = {The objective of this project is to provide novel and fast reduced-order models for onboard computation at sensor nodes for real-time analysis. The approach will require that LANL perform high-fidelity numerical simulations, construct simple reduced-order models (ROMs) using machine learning and signal processing algorithms, and use real-time data analysis for ROMs and compressive sensing at sensor nodes.},
doi = {10.2172/1369163},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 7
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share:
  • The Internet of Things (IoT) is about Internet-addressability and connectivity for everyday devices. The goal of this project was to create a framework to allow developers to more easily control IoT devices and turn their interactions into meaningful applications. We leveraged a tierless approach for Software Defined Networking (SDN) to build this framework. We expanded Flowlog, a tierless programming language for SDN controllers, to support IoT devices developed by Spark IO to build this framework.
  • The Environmental and Engineering Geophysical Society (EEGS), a nonprofit professional organization, conducted an educational series of seminars at the Symposium on the Application of Geophysics to Engineering and Environmental Problems (SAGEEP) in Philadelphia in April 2008. The purpose of these seminars, conducted under the name Environmental and Engineering Geophysical University (EEGU) over three days in parallel with the regular SAGEEP technical sessions, was to introduce nontraditional geophysical conference attendees to the appropriate use of geophysics in environmental and engineering projects. Five half-day, classroom-style sessions were led by recognized experts in the application of seismic, electrical, gravity, magnetics, and ground-penetrating radarmore » methods. Classroom sessions were intended to educate regulators, environmental program managers, consultants, and students who are new to near-surface geophysics or are interested in learning how to incorporate appropriate geophysical approaches into characterization or remediation programs or evaluate the suitability of geophysical methods for general classes of environmental or engineering problems.« less
  • The office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI), Battelle Memorial Institute, is responsible for managing parts of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) Program administered by the US Department of Energy. Under this Program, ONWI is investigating sites potentially suitable for long-term disposal of nuclear wastes. The process to identify such sites is lengthy, requiring extensive geologic, engineering and environmental studies. The purpose of this report is twofold. First, it describes the wide range of geologic and geophysical studies that are or may be conducted as part of the NWTS Program. Second, it discusses potential environmental impacts associated with these studies.more » The environmental discussions focus on activities with the greatest potential impact and describe techniques to mitigate them. The geologic and geophysical studies described in this report do not specifically include those impacts associated with deep drilling activities. This report consists of two major sections. Section 2 describes the geologic and geophysical activities which may take place at selected site locations. Section 3 focuses on the most potentially affected resources and describes the potential environmental impacts associated with activities identified in Section 2.« less
  • An atmospheric data base consisting of volume-mixing ratios (o0 to 12 okm) for 28 minor and trace gases was assembled for use with spectral-radiance transmittance models. Six reference atmospheres, each defining temperature, pressure and density as a function of altitude (selected from the U.S. Standard Supplements, 1966 and the U.S. Standard Atmosphere, 1976) provide a range of climatological choices. Analogous zonal-mean descriptions for H/sub 2/O, O/sub 3/, N/sub 2/O, CO, and CH/sub 4/ were subsequently adapted from satellite data and/or dynamical-photochemical analyses. The remaining species are defined by single profiles, usually appropriate for U.S. Standard conditions. Because the entire profilemore » set is preferentially based on available measurements, explicit photochemical consistency between the different species has not been maintained.« less
  • Technical discussions at the various sites visited centered on application of boundary integral methods for environmental modeling, seismic analysis, and computational fracture mechanics in composite and smart'' materials. The traveler also attended the International Association for Boundary Element Methods Conference at Rome, Italy. While many aspects of boundary element theory and applications were discussed in the papers, the dominant topic was the analysis and application of hypersingular equations. This has been the focus of recent work by the author, and thus the conference was highly relevant to research at ORNL.