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Title: Why Are We Talking About Capacity Markets?

Abstract

Revenue sufficiency or 'missing money' concerns in wholesale electricity markets are important because they could lead to resource (or capacity) adequacy shortfalls. Capacity markets or other capacity-based payments are among the proposed solutions to remedy these challenges. This presentation provides a high-level overview of the importance of and process for ensuring resource adequacy, and then discusses considerations for capacity markets under futures with high penetrations of variable resources such as wind and solar.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind and Water Technologies Office (EE-4W)
OSTI Identifier:
1369134
Report Number(s):
NREL/PR-6A20-68593
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at the EU/US Workshop on Market Design and Operation with Variable Renewables, 16-17 May 2017, Fredericia, Denmark
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; capacity markets; capacity payments; market failure; revenue sufficiency; missing money; reliability; resource adequacy

Citation Formats

Frew, Bethany. Why Are We Talking About Capacity Markets?. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Frew, Bethany. Why Are We Talking About Capacity Markets?. United States.
Frew, Bethany. Wed . "Why Are We Talking About Capacity Markets?". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1369134.
@article{osti_1369134,
title = {Why Are We Talking About Capacity Markets?},
author = {Frew, Bethany},
abstractNote = {Revenue sufficiency or 'missing money' concerns in wholesale electricity markets are important because they could lead to resource (or capacity) adequacy shortfalls. Capacity markets or other capacity-based payments are among the proposed solutions to remedy these challenges. This presentation provides a high-level overview of the importance of and process for ensuring resource adequacy, and then discusses considerations for capacity markets under futures with high penetrations of variable resources such as wind and solar.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 28 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Wed Jun 28 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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