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Title: Wind Lidar Activities in the United States

Abstract

IEA Wind Task 32 seeks to identify and mitigate the barriers to the adoption of lidar for wind energy applications. This work is partly achieved by sharing experience across researchers and practitioners in the United States and worldwide. This presentation is a short summary of some wind lidar-related activities taking place in the country, and was presented by Andrew Clifton at the Task 32 meeting in December 2016 in his role as the U.S. Department of Energy-nominated country representative to the task.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind and Water Technologies Office (EE-4W)
OSTI Identifier:
1369132
Report Number(s):
NREL/PR-5000-67644
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at the International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Task 32 General Meeting, 15-16 December 2016, Glasgow Scotland
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; International Energy Agency; IEA Wind; lidar; wind turbine; wind energy; lidar trends; sodar

Citation Formats

Clifton, Andrew, Newman, Jennifer, St. Pe, Alexandra, Iungo, G. Valerio, Wharton, Sonia, Herges, Tommy, Filippelli, Matthew, Pontbriand, Philippe, and Osler, Evan. Wind Lidar Activities in the United States. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Clifton, Andrew, Newman, Jennifer, St. Pe, Alexandra, Iungo, G. Valerio, Wharton, Sonia, Herges, Tommy, Filippelli, Matthew, Pontbriand, Philippe, & Osler, Evan. Wind Lidar Activities in the United States. United States.
Clifton, Andrew, Newman, Jennifer, St. Pe, Alexandra, Iungo, G. Valerio, Wharton, Sonia, Herges, Tommy, Filippelli, Matthew, Pontbriand, Philippe, and Osler, Evan. Wed . "Wind Lidar Activities in the United States". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1369132.
@article{osti_1369132,
title = {Wind Lidar Activities in the United States},
author = {Clifton, Andrew and Newman, Jennifer and St. Pe, Alexandra and Iungo, G. Valerio and Wharton, Sonia and Herges, Tommy and Filippelli, Matthew and Pontbriand, Philippe and Osler, Evan},
abstractNote = {IEA Wind Task 32 seeks to identify and mitigate the barriers to the adoption of lidar for wind energy applications. This work is partly achieved by sharing experience across researchers and practitioners in the United States and worldwide. This presentation is a short summary of some wind lidar-related activities taking place in the country, and was presented by Andrew Clifton at the Task 32 meeting in December 2016 in his role as the U.S. Department of Energy-nominated country representative to the task.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 28 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Wed Jun 28 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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