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Title: Time dependent genetic analysis links field and controlled environment phenotypes in the model C 4 grass Setaria

Abstract

Vertical growth of plants is a dynamic process that is influenced by genetic and environmental factors and has a pronounced effect on overall plant architecture and biomass composition. For this research, we have performed six controlled growth trials of an interspecific Setaria italica x Setaria viridis recombinant inbred line population to assess how the genetic architecture of plant height is influenced by developmental queues, water availability and planting density. The non-destructive nature of plant height measurements has enabled us to monitor height throughout the plant life cycle in both field and controlled environments. We find that plant height is reduced under water limitation and high density planting and affected by growth environment (field vs. growth chamber). The results support a model where plant height is a heritable, polygenic trait and that the major genetic loci that influence plant height function independent of growth environment. The identity and contribution of loci that influence height changes dynamically throughout development and the reduction of growth observed in water limited environments is a consequence of delayed progression through the genetic program which establishes plant height in Setaria. In this population, alleles inherited from the weedy S. viridis parent act to increase plant height early,more » whereas a larger number of small effect alleles inherited from the domesticated S. italica parent collectively act to increase plant height later in development.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [1];  [3];  [3];  [1];  [4];  [1];  [3];  [2]; ORCiD logo [5]
  1. Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, St. Louis, MO (United States)
  2. Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Dept. of Plant Biology and Inst. for Genomic Biology
  3. Carnegie Inst. of Science, Stanford, CA (United States). Dept. of Plant Biology
  4. Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Dept. of Crop Sciences
  5. Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, St. Louis, MO (United States); USDA-ARS, Plant Genetics Research Unit, St. Louis, MO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, St. Louis, MO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23). Biological Systems Science Division; USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS); USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1369107
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1365607; OSTI ID: 1423881
Grant/Contract Number:  
sc0008769
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
PLoS Genetics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 13; Journal Issue: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 1553-7404
Publisher:
Public Library of Science
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; Quantitative trait loci; genetic loci; gene mapping; setaria; heredity; plant genetics; maize; flowering plants

Citation Formats

Feldman, Max J., Paul, Rachel E., Banan, Darshi, Barrett, Jennifer F., Sebastian, Jose, Yee, Muh-Ching, Jiang, Hui, Lipka, Alexander E., Brutnell, Thomas P., Dinneny, José R., Leakey, Andrew D. B., and Baxter, Ivan. Time dependent genetic analysis links field and controlled environment phenotypes in the model C4 grass Setaria. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1006841.
Feldman, Max J., Paul, Rachel E., Banan, Darshi, Barrett, Jennifer F., Sebastian, Jose, Yee, Muh-Ching, Jiang, Hui, Lipka, Alexander E., Brutnell, Thomas P., Dinneny, José R., Leakey, Andrew D. B., & Baxter, Ivan. Time dependent genetic analysis links field and controlled environment phenotypes in the model C4 grass Setaria. United States. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1006841.
Feldman, Max J., Paul, Rachel E., Banan, Darshi, Barrett, Jennifer F., Sebastian, Jose, Yee, Muh-Ching, Jiang, Hui, Lipka, Alexander E., Brutnell, Thomas P., Dinneny, José R., Leakey, Andrew D. B., and Baxter, Ivan. Fri . "Time dependent genetic analysis links field and controlled environment phenotypes in the model C4 grass Setaria". United States. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1006841.
@article{osti_1369107,
title = {Time dependent genetic analysis links field and controlled environment phenotypes in the model C4 grass Setaria},
author = {Feldman, Max J. and Paul, Rachel E. and Banan, Darshi and Barrett, Jennifer F. and Sebastian, Jose and Yee, Muh-Ching and Jiang, Hui and Lipka, Alexander E. and Brutnell, Thomas P. and Dinneny, José R. and Leakey, Andrew D. B. and Baxter, Ivan},
abstractNote = {Vertical growth of plants is a dynamic process that is influenced by genetic and environmental factors and has a pronounced effect on overall plant architecture and biomass composition. For this research, we have performed six controlled growth trials of an interspecific Setaria italica x Setaria viridis recombinant inbred line population to assess how the genetic architecture of plant height is influenced by developmental queues, water availability and planting density. The non-destructive nature of plant height measurements has enabled us to monitor height throughout the plant life cycle in both field and controlled environments. We find that plant height is reduced under water limitation and high density planting and affected by growth environment (field vs. growth chamber). The results support a model where plant height is a heritable, polygenic trait and that the major genetic loci that influence plant height function independent of growth environment. The identity and contribution of loci that influence height changes dynamically throughout development and the reduction of growth observed in water limited environments is a consequence of delayed progression through the genetic program which establishes plant height in Setaria. In this population, alleles inherited from the weedy S. viridis parent act to increase plant height early, whereas a larger number of small effect alleles inherited from the domesticated S. italica parent collectively act to increase plant height later in development.},
doi = {10.1371/journal.pgen.1006841},
journal = {PLoS Genetics},
number = 6,
volume = 13,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jun 23 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri Jun 23 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1371/journal.pgen.1006841

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 4 works
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