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Title: Time dependent genetic analysis links field and controlled environment phenotypes in the model C 4 grass Setaria


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Feldman, Max J., Paul, Rachel E., Banan, Darshi, Barrett, Jennifer F., Sebastian, Jose, Yee, Muh-Ching, Jiang, Hui, Lipka, Alexander E., Brutnell, Thomas P., Dinneny, José R., Leakey, Andrew D. B., Baxter, Ivan, and Mauricio, Rodney. Time dependent genetic analysis links field and controlled environment phenotypes in the model C4 grass Setaria. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1006841.
Feldman, Max J., Paul, Rachel E., Banan, Darshi, Barrett, Jennifer F., Sebastian, Jose, Yee, Muh-Ching, Jiang, Hui, Lipka, Alexander E., Brutnell, Thomas P., Dinneny, José R., Leakey, Andrew D. B., Baxter, Ivan, & Mauricio, Rodney. Time dependent genetic analysis links field and controlled environment phenotypes in the model C4 grass Setaria. United States. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1006841.
Feldman, Max J., Paul, Rachel E., Banan, Darshi, Barrett, Jennifer F., Sebastian, Jose, Yee, Muh-Ching, Jiang, Hui, Lipka, Alexander E., Brutnell, Thomas P., Dinneny, José R., Leakey, Andrew D. B., Baxter, Ivan, and Mauricio, Rodney. 2017. "Time dependent genetic analysis links field and controlled environment phenotypes in the model C4 grass Setaria". United States. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1006841.
@article{osti_1369107,
title = {Time dependent genetic analysis links field and controlled environment phenotypes in the model C4 grass Setaria},
author = {Feldman, Max J. and Paul, Rachel E. and Banan, Darshi and Barrett, Jennifer F. and Sebastian, Jose and Yee, Muh-Ching and Jiang, Hui and Lipka, Alexander E. and Brutnell, Thomas P. and Dinneny, José R. and Leakey, Andrew D. B. and Baxter, Ivan and Mauricio, Rodney},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1371/journal.pgen.1006841},
journal = {PLoS Genetics},
number = 6,
volume = 13,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 6
}

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Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1371/journal.pgen.1006841

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