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Title: The Perils of Space Weather

Abstract

The Sun’s continuous bombardment of the Earth with high-energy electrons, protons, and other nuclei results in space weather that can wreak havoc on the nation’s satellites, aircraft, communications networks, navigation systems, and the electric power grid. Because of the potential for space weather to so critically impact national security, Los Alamos National Laboratory has been studying it for decades, designing and building space-based sensors to detect emissions from potential nuclear events here on Earth and to study natural and man-made radiation in space.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1369047
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS; 46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; 98 NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT, SAFEGUARDS, AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION; LANL; VAN ALLEN RADIATION BELT; SATELLITES; RADIATION BELTS; NUCLEAR TEST BAN TREATY; SPACE WEATHER; SPACE STORMS; CHARGED PARTICLES

Citation Formats

Reeves, Geoff. The Perils of Space Weather. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Reeves, Geoff. The Perils of Space Weather. United States.
Reeves, Geoff. Thu . "The Perils of Space Weather". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1369047.
@article{osti_1369047,
title = {The Perils of Space Weather},
author = {Reeves, Geoff},
abstractNote = {The Sun’s continuous bombardment of the Earth with high-energy electrons, protons, and other nuclei results in space weather that can wreak havoc on the nation’s satellites, aircraft, communications networks, navigation systems, and the electric power grid. Because of the potential for space weather to so critically impact national security, Los Alamos National Laboratory has been studying it for decades, designing and building space-based sensors to detect emissions from potential nuclear events here on Earth and to study natural and man-made radiation in space.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Apr 27 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Apr 27 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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