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Title: Halos on Mars Could Mean a Longer Life-Friendly Past

Abstract

Lighter-toned bedrock that surrounds fractures and comprises high concentrations of silica—called “halos”—has been found in Gale crater on Mars, indicating that the planet had liquid water much longer than previously believed.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1369039
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS; 58 GEOSCIENCES; 38 RADIATION CHEMISTRY, RADIOCHEMISTRY, AND NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY; LANL; MARS; CURIOSITY ROVER; LIQUID WATER; SILICA; BEDROCK; HALOS; NASA; CHEMCAM

Citation Formats

None. Halos on Mars Could Mean a Longer Life-Friendly Past. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
None. Halos on Mars Could Mean a Longer Life-Friendly Past. United States.
None. Thu . "Halos on Mars Could Mean a Longer Life-Friendly Past". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1369039.
@article{osti_1369039,
title = {Halos on Mars Could Mean a Longer Life-Friendly Past},
author = {None},
abstractNote = {Lighter-toned bedrock that surrounds fractures and comprises high concentrations of silica—called “halos”—has been found in Gale crater on Mars, indicating that the planet had liquid water much longer than previously believed.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu May 25 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu May 25 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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