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Title: A Universal Biosensor for Infectious Disease

Abstract

With increased travel and globalization, the spread of new diseases has become a threat to global health—and global security. Whether in a rural village or an urban medical clinic, healthcare workers need diagnostics that provide answers then and there, for any disease, in order to effectively treat individual patients or widespread outbreaks. That’s why Harshini Mukundan and her team at Los Alamos National Laboratory are working to develop a universal biosensor. “If we are able to mimic the body’s immune recognition in the laboratory, we could have a universal strategy for the early diagnosis of all infections,” said Mukundan. Our immune system recognizes pathogens, regardless of their origin, by identifying discrete signatures in the human host. Mukundan's team is working to imitate this ability in the laboratory, which could lead to a simple solution to diagnose all diseases and improve lives across the world.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
LANL (Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1369037
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; INFECTIOUS DISEASES; DIAGNOSTICS; IMMUNE SYSTEM; UNIVERSAL BIOSENSOR; TUBERCULOSIS

Citation Formats

Mukundan, Harshini. A Universal Biosensor for Infectious Disease. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Mukundan, Harshini. A Universal Biosensor for Infectious Disease. United States.
Mukundan, Harshini. Thu . "A Universal Biosensor for Infectious Disease". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1369037.
@article{osti_1369037,
title = {A Universal Biosensor for Infectious Disease},
author = {Mukundan, Harshini},
abstractNote = {With increased travel and globalization, the spread of new diseases has become a threat to global health—and global security. Whether in a rural village or an urban medical clinic, healthcare workers need diagnostics that provide answers then and there, for any disease, in order to effectively treat individual patients or widespread outbreaks. That’s why Harshini Mukundan and her team at Los Alamos National Laboratory are working to develop a universal biosensor. “If we are able to mimic the body’s immune recognition in the laboratory, we could have a universal strategy for the early diagnosis of all infections,” said Mukundan. Our immune system recognizes pathogens, regardless of their origin, by identifying discrete signatures in the human host. Mukundan's team is working to imitate this ability in the laboratory, which could lead to a simple solution to diagnose all diseases and improve lives across the world.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jul 06 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Jul 06 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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