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Title: Kaposi’s sarcoma–associated herpesvirus stably clusters its genomes across generations to maintain itself extrachromosomally

Abstract

Genetic elements that replicate extrachromosomally are rare in mammals; however, several human tumor viruses, including the papillomaviruses and the gammaherpesviruses, maintain their plasmid genomes by tethering them to cellular chromosomes. We have uncovered an unprecedented mechanism of viral replication: Kaposi’s sarcoma–associated herpesvirus (KSHV) stably clusters its genomes across generations to maintain itself extrachromosomally. To identify and characterize this mechanism, we developed two complementary, independent approaches: live-cell imaging and a predictive computational model. The clustering of KSHV requires the viral protein, LANA1, to bind viral genomes to nucleosomes arrayed on both cellular and viral DNA. Clustering affects both viral partitioning and viral genome numbers of KSHV. The clustering of KSHV plasmids provides it with an effective evolutionary strategy to rapidly increase copy numbers of genomes per cell at the expense of the total numbers of cells infected.

Authors:
; ; ORCiD logo; ORCiD logo; ORCiD logo
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1368608
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Cell Biology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Journal of Cell Biology; Journal ID: ISSN 0021-9525
Publisher:
Rockefeller University Press
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Chiu, Ya-Fang, Sugden, Arthur U., Fox, Kathryn, Hayes, Mitchell, and Sugden, Bill. Kaposi’s sarcoma–associated herpesvirus stably clusters its genomes across generations to maintain itself extrachromosomally. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1083/jcb.201702013.
Chiu, Ya-Fang, Sugden, Arthur U., Fox, Kathryn, Hayes, Mitchell, & Sugden, Bill. Kaposi’s sarcoma–associated herpesvirus stably clusters its genomes across generations to maintain itself extrachromosomally. United States. doi:10.1083/jcb.201702013.
Chiu, Ya-Fang, Sugden, Arthur U., Fox, Kathryn, Hayes, Mitchell, and Sugden, Bill. Mon . "Kaposi’s sarcoma–associated herpesvirus stably clusters its genomes across generations to maintain itself extrachromosomally". United States. doi:10.1083/jcb.201702013.
@article{osti_1368608,
title = {Kaposi’s sarcoma–associated herpesvirus stably clusters its genomes across generations to maintain itself extrachromosomally},
author = {Chiu, Ya-Fang and Sugden, Arthur U. and Fox, Kathryn and Hayes, Mitchell and Sugden, Bill},
abstractNote = {Genetic elements that replicate extrachromosomally are rare in mammals; however, several human tumor viruses, including the papillomaviruses and the gammaherpesviruses, maintain their plasmid genomes by tethering them to cellular chromosomes. We have uncovered an unprecedented mechanism of viral replication: Kaposi’s sarcoma–associated herpesvirus (KSHV) stably clusters its genomes across generations to maintain itself extrachromosomally. To identify and characterize this mechanism, we developed two complementary, independent approaches: live-cell imaging and a predictive computational model. The clustering of KSHV requires the viral protein, LANA1, to bind viral genomes to nucleosomes arrayed on both cellular and viral DNA. Clustering affects both viral partitioning and viral genome numbers of KSHV. The clustering of KSHV plasmids provides it with an effective evolutionary strategy to rapidly increase copy numbers of genomes per cell at the expense of the total numbers of cells infected.},
doi = {10.1083/jcb.201702013},
journal = {Journal of Cell Biology},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jul 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Jul 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1083/jcb.201702013

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 4 works
Citation information provided by
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