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Title: Investigation of Synthetic Spider Silk Crystallinity and Alignment via Electrothermal, Pyroelectric, Literature XRD, and Tensile Techniques

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [5]
  1. Mechanical Engineering Department, Brigham Young University, Provo UT 84602 USA
  2. Laboratory for Soft Matter and Biophysics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, KU Leuven Heverlee B-3001 Belgium; Functional Organic Materials and Devices, Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, TU/e Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven The Netherlands
  3. Synthetic Bioproducts Center, Biology Department, Utah State University, North Logan UT 84341 USA
  4. Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Utah State University, Logan UT 84322 USA
  5. Laboratory for Soft Matter and Biophysics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, KU Leuven Heverlee B-3001 Belgium
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
FOREIGN
OSTI Identifier:
1368306
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Macromolecular Materials and Engineering; Journal Volume: 302; Journal Issue: 4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Munro, Troy, Putzeys, Tristan, Copeland, Cameron G., Xing, Changhu, Lewis, Randolph V., Ban, Heng, Glorieux, Christ, and Wubbenhorst, Michael. Investigation of Synthetic Spider Silk Crystallinity and Alignment via Electrothermal, Pyroelectric, Literature XRD, and Tensile Techniques. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/mame.201600480.
Munro, Troy, Putzeys, Tristan, Copeland, Cameron G., Xing, Changhu, Lewis, Randolph V., Ban, Heng, Glorieux, Christ, & Wubbenhorst, Michael. Investigation of Synthetic Spider Silk Crystallinity and Alignment via Electrothermal, Pyroelectric, Literature XRD, and Tensile Techniques. United States. doi:10.1002/mame.201600480.
Munro, Troy, Putzeys, Tristan, Copeland, Cameron G., Xing, Changhu, Lewis, Randolph V., Ban, Heng, Glorieux, Christ, and Wubbenhorst, Michael. Mon . "Investigation of Synthetic Spider Silk Crystallinity and Alignment via Electrothermal, Pyroelectric, Literature XRD, and Tensile Techniques". United States. doi:10.1002/mame.201600480.
@article{osti_1368306,
title = {Investigation of Synthetic Spider Silk Crystallinity and Alignment via Electrothermal, Pyroelectric, Literature XRD, and Tensile Techniques},
author = {Munro, Troy and Putzeys, Tristan and Copeland, Cameron G. and Xing, Changhu and Lewis, Randolph V. and Ban, Heng and Glorieux, Christ and Wubbenhorst, Michael},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/mame.201600480},
journal = {Macromolecular Materials and Engineering},
number = 4,
volume = 302,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 30 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Mon Jan 30 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
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