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Title: Controlling shockwave dynamics using architecture in periodic porous materials

Authors:
ORCiD logo; ; ; ; ORCiD logo; ; ORCiD logo; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE-NNSA
OSTI Identifier:
1368284
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 121; Journal Issue: 13
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Branch, Brittany, Ionita, Axinte, Clements, Bradford E., Montgomery, David S., Jensen, Brian J., Patterson, Brian, Schmalzer, Andrew, Mueller, Alexander, and Dattelbaum, Dana M. Controlling shockwave dynamics using architecture in periodic porous materials. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4978910.
Branch, Brittany, Ionita, Axinte, Clements, Bradford E., Montgomery, David S., Jensen, Brian J., Patterson, Brian, Schmalzer, Andrew, Mueller, Alexander, & Dattelbaum, Dana M. Controlling shockwave dynamics using architecture in periodic porous materials. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4978910.
Branch, Brittany, Ionita, Axinte, Clements, Bradford E., Montgomery, David S., Jensen, Brian J., Patterson, Brian, Schmalzer, Andrew, Mueller, Alexander, and Dattelbaum, Dana M. Fri . "Controlling shockwave dynamics using architecture in periodic porous materials". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4978910.
@article{osti_1368284,
title = {Controlling shockwave dynamics using architecture in periodic porous materials},
author = {Branch, Brittany and Ionita, Axinte and Clements, Bradford E. and Montgomery, David S. and Jensen, Brian J. and Patterson, Brian and Schmalzer, Andrew and Mueller, Alexander and Dattelbaum, Dana M.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1063/1.4978910},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 13,
volume = 121,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Apr 07 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri Apr 07 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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