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Title: In situ determination of crystal structure and chemistry of minerals at Earth's deep lower mantle conditions

Abstract

Recent advances in experimental techniques and data processing allow in situ determination of mineral crystal structure and chemistry up to Mbar pressures in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell (DAC), providing the fundamental information of the mineralogical constitution of our Earth's interior. This work highlights several recent breakthroughs in the field of high-pressure mineral crystallography, including the stability of bridgmanite, the single-crystal structure studies of post-perovskite and H-phase as well as the identification of hydrous minerals and iron oxides in the deep lower mantle. The future development of high-pressure crystallography is also discussed.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1368245
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Matter and Radiation at Extremes; Journal Volume: 2; Journal Issue: 3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; X-ray diffraction; Multigrain; Lower mantle; High pressure-temperature

Citation Formats

Yuan, Hongsheng, and Zhang, Li. In situ determination of crystal structure and chemistry of minerals at Earth's deep lower mantle conditions. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.mre.2017.01.002.
Yuan, Hongsheng, & Zhang, Li. In situ determination of crystal structure and chemistry of minerals at Earth's deep lower mantle conditions. United States. doi:10.1016/j.mre.2017.01.002.
Yuan, Hongsheng, and Zhang, Li. Mon . "In situ determination of crystal structure and chemistry of minerals at Earth's deep lower mantle conditions". United States. doi:10.1016/j.mre.2017.01.002.
@article{osti_1368245,
title = {In situ determination of crystal structure and chemistry of minerals at Earth's deep lower mantle conditions},
author = {Yuan, Hongsheng and Zhang, Li},
abstractNote = {Recent advances in experimental techniques and data processing allow in situ determination of mineral crystal structure and chemistry up to Mbar pressures in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell (DAC), providing the fundamental information of the mineralogical constitution of our Earth's interior. This work highlights several recent breakthroughs in the field of high-pressure mineral crystallography, including the stability of bridgmanite, the single-crystal structure studies of post-perovskite and H-phase as well as the identification of hydrous minerals and iron oxides in the deep lower mantle. The future development of high-pressure crystallography is also discussed.},
doi = {10.1016/j.mre.2017.01.002},
journal = {Matter and Radiation at Extremes},
number = 3,
volume = 2,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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