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Title: T cells control the generation of nanomolar-affinity anti-glycan antibodies

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ORCiD logo; ; ; more »; ; ; « less
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
UNIVERSITYINDUSTRY
OSTI Identifier:
1368224
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Clinical Investigation; Journal Volume: 127; Journal Issue: 4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Polonskaya, Zinaida, Deng, Shenglou, Sarkar, Anita, Kain, Lisa, Comellas-Aragones, Marta, McKay, Craig S., Kaczanowska, Katarzyna, Holt, Marie, McBride, Ryan, Palomo, Valle, Self, Kevin M., Taylor, Seth, Irimia, Adriana, Mehta, Sanjay R., Dan, Jennifer M., Brigger, Matthew, Crotty, Shane, Schoenberger, Stephen P., Paulson, James C., Wilson, Ian A., Savage, Paul B., Finn, M. G., and Teyton, Luc. T cells control the generation of nanomolar-affinity anti-glycan antibodies. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1172/JCI91192.
Polonskaya, Zinaida, Deng, Shenglou, Sarkar, Anita, Kain, Lisa, Comellas-Aragones, Marta, McKay, Craig S., Kaczanowska, Katarzyna, Holt, Marie, McBride, Ryan, Palomo, Valle, Self, Kevin M., Taylor, Seth, Irimia, Adriana, Mehta, Sanjay R., Dan, Jennifer M., Brigger, Matthew, Crotty, Shane, Schoenberger, Stephen P., Paulson, James C., Wilson, Ian A., Savage, Paul B., Finn, M. G., & Teyton, Luc. T cells control the generation of nanomolar-affinity anti-glycan antibodies. United States. doi:10.1172/JCI91192.
Polonskaya, Zinaida, Deng, Shenglou, Sarkar, Anita, Kain, Lisa, Comellas-Aragones, Marta, McKay, Craig S., Kaczanowska, Katarzyna, Holt, Marie, McBride, Ryan, Palomo, Valle, Self, Kevin M., Taylor, Seth, Irimia, Adriana, Mehta, Sanjay R., Dan, Jennifer M., Brigger, Matthew, Crotty, Shane, Schoenberger, Stephen P., Paulson, James C., Wilson, Ian A., Savage, Paul B., Finn, M. G., and Teyton, Luc. Mon . "T cells control the generation of nanomolar-affinity anti-glycan antibodies". United States. doi:10.1172/JCI91192.
@article{osti_1368224,
title = {T cells control the generation of nanomolar-affinity anti-glycan antibodies},
author = {Polonskaya, Zinaida and Deng, Shenglou and Sarkar, Anita and Kain, Lisa and Comellas-Aragones, Marta and McKay, Craig S. and Kaczanowska, Katarzyna and Holt, Marie and McBride, Ryan and Palomo, Valle and Self, Kevin M. and Taylor, Seth and Irimia, Adriana and Mehta, Sanjay R. and Dan, Jennifer M. and Brigger, Matthew and Crotty, Shane and Schoenberger, Stephen P. and Paulson, James C. and Wilson, Ian A. and Savage, Paul B. and Finn, M. G. and Teyton, Luc},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1172/JCI91192},
journal = {Journal of Clinical Investigation},
number = 4,
volume = 127,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 13 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Mar 13 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
  • During the modulation of the T3/Ti complex by anti-T3 antibody, 235, of IgM class, a new antigen, Tml was detected with an IgGl mAb produced against mAb 235 treated T cells. This antigen was inducible only on T cells modulated by IgM anti-T3 (mAb 235 and mAb 38.1) and not by anti-T3 of other isotypes. Tml was a 33Kd molecule which was detectable in a small percentage of T cells and B cells but not on granulocytes, platelets, erythrocytes and thymocytes. Significantly, monocytes displayed this antigen on their cell surfaces. While not detectable on leukemic T cells HPB-ALL and Jurkat,more » Tml was expressed when these cell lines were modulated with 235. T cells activated by PHA, Con A, TPA, PWM, PPD, and allo-antigens showed little increase in the expression of Tml. In contrast, B cells activated by S. aureus or goat anti-mu antibodies along with BCGF showed increased expression of this antigen. Attempts to precipitate Tml from activated B cells have not been successful. On T cells, Tml appeared after 30 minutes of T3 modulation, before the disappearance of T3 antigen. Cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor, did not block Tml expression, suggesting that the molecule was present before the modulation process. The expression of Tml is induced uniquely by IgM anti-T3 mAbs. Perturbation of the membrane by these mAbs may have allowed the emergence of an intracellular antigen, Tml, on the cell surface.« less
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