skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Final Research Performance Progress Report: Geothermal Resource Development with Zero Mass Withdrawal, Engineered Convection, and Wellbore Energy Conversion

Abstract

This project is intended to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility, and environmental and social attractiveness of a novel method of heat extraction from geothermal reservoirs. The emphasis is on assessing the potential for a heat extraction method that couples forced and free convection to maximize extraction efficiency. The heat extraction concept is enhanced by considering wellbore energy conversion, which may include only a boiler for a working fluid, or perhaps a complete boiler, turbine, and condenser cycle within the wellbore. The feasibility of this system depends on maintaining mechanical and hydraulic integrity of the wellbore, so the material properties of the casing-cement system are examined both experimentally and with well design calculations. The attractiveness depends on mitigation of seismic and subsidence risks, economic performance, environmental impact, and social impact – all of which are assessed as components of this study.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Geothermal Technologies Office (EE-4G)
OSTI Identifier:
1368194
Report Number(s):
DOE-LSU-0005125-1
DOE Contract Number:
EE0005125
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; Geothermal energy; Wellbore energy conversion; cement integrity; Screening models; seismic risk

Citation Formats

Hughes, Richard, Tyagi, Mayank, Radonjic, Mileva, Dahi, Arash, Wang, Fahui, John, Chacko, Kaiser, Mark, Snyder, Brian, and Sears, Stephen. Final Research Performance Progress Report: Geothermal Resource Development with Zero Mass Withdrawal, Engineered Convection, and Wellbore Energy Conversion. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1368194.
Hughes, Richard, Tyagi, Mayank, Radonjic, Mileva, Dahi, Arash, Wang, Fahui, John, Chacko, Kaiser, Mark, Snyder, Brian, & Sears, Stephen. Final Research Performance Progress Report: Geothermal Resource Development with Zero Mass Withdrawal, Engineered Convection, and Wellbore Energy Conversion. United States. doi:10.2172/1368194.
Hughes, Richard, Tyagi, Mayank, Radonjic, Mileva, Dahi, Arash, Wang, Fahui, John, Chacko, Kaiser, Mark, Snyder, Brian, and Sears, Stephen. Fri . "Final Research Performance Progress Report: Geothermal Resource Development with Zero Mass Withdrawal, Engineered Convection, and Wellbore Energy Conversion". United States. doi:10.2172/1368194. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1368194.
@article{osti_1368194,
title = {Final Research Performance Progress Report: Geothermal Resource Development with Zero Mass Withdrawal, Engineered Convection, and Wellbore Energy Conversion},
author = {Hughes, Richard and Tyagi, Mayank and Radonjic, Mileva and Dahi, Arash and Wang, Fahui and John, Chacko and Kaiser, Mark and Snyder, Brian and Sears, Stephen},
abstractNote = {This project is intended to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility, and environmental and social attractiveness of a novel method of heat extraction from geothermal reservoirs. The emphasis is on assessing the potential for a heat extraction method that couples forced and free convection to maximize extraction efficiency. The heat extraction concept is enhanced by considering wellbore energy conversion, which may include only a boiler for a working fluid, or perhaps a complete boiler, turbine, and condenser cycle within the wellbore. The feasibility of this system depends on maintaining mechanical and hydraulic integrity of the wellbore, so the material properties of the casing-cement system are examined both experimentally and with well design calculations. The attractiveness depends on mitigation of seismic and subsidence risks, economic performance, environmental impact, and social impact – all of which are assessed as components of this study.},
doi = {10.2172/1368194},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jul 07 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri Jul 07 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share:
  • Some of the methods available for predicting the pressure drop in a vertical two-phase flow were examined for their usefulness in analyzing the behavior of the two-phase flow in a geothermal wellbore. Previous work in this area has generally been directed toward maximizing the deliverability of the wellbore . In order to get a fresh view point the mechanical efficiency of the two-phase flow in lifting the fluid to the surface was examined. Two well-known methods were applied to geothermal Mesa 6-1, the Hagedorn-Brown holdup correlation, and Wallis' drift flux slug flow model. Predicted mechanical efficiencies were about 30%; themore » actual measured efficiency is 35%. Both methods gave similar results for the overall pressure drop, but predicted opposing strategies for improving performance. The Hagedorn-Brown correlation suggests that the wellbore diameter be increased in order to reduce pressure drop, while Wallis' drift flux slug flow model suggests the opposite. The need for more data in the geothermal diameter and fluid properties range is quite apparent.« less
  • The objectives of the program are: (1) development of a preliminary design for the full-sized power system module to be used in the 100 MWe OTEC Demonstration Plant by 1984 to demonstrate operational performance and to project economic viability; (2) preliminary design for a proof-of-concept 5 MWe (nominal pilot plant, (Test Article); (3) preliminary design for proof-of-concept 1 MWe scaled heat exchangers (Test Articles); and (4) preparation of a Phase II hardware and support plan (proposal) for the scaled test articles. Status of the program is described. (WHK)
  • A 7-month study of physical phenomena occurring in geothermal basins is described. Geological and geophysical field data are used to develop plausible models of the energy-mass transport systems in geothermal anomalies. The basic describing equations for saturated thermally-active elastic porous media are discussed in the context of modelling physical processes occurring in the geothermal environment. Progress in code development is considered. Calculations for heat and mass transport due to natural convection in model systems are described. The importance of using variable fluid properties is emphasized. (GRA)
  • This report deals with the modeling of physical processes occurring in liquid-dominated geothermal systems. The topics which are described include: (1) An analysis of field data from the Mesa Anomaly, Imperial Valley, California leading to a physical characterization of that system; (2) presence and role of fault zones in a geothermal area; (3) deformations occurring in a model of a geothermal area due to earthtide loading; (4) heat and mass transfer in fault zones and large-scale geothermal systems; and (5) deformation and failure of rock systems in a saturated, high temperature and pressure environment. (GRA)
  • By the end of the first year of the Southwest Regional Geothermal Project, the Nevada State Team has defined over 300 geothermal sites. Because of the multitude of sites and data, scenarios for this first project-year have been completed for the twenty-six Nevada Geothermal Areas, which include all the specific sites. It is not improbable that fully one-third of the sites will eventually prove to be of high to intermediate temperature (i.e. > 150 C and 90-150 C) resources. Low temperature sites are also prominent, not only in number, but also in their distribution--each of Nevada's 17 counties has severalmore » such sites.« less