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Title: 2D Variations in Coda Amplitudes in the Middle East

Abstract

Here, coda amplitudes have proven to be a stable feature of seismograms, allowing one to reliably measure magnitudes for moderate to large-sized (M≥3) earthquakes over broad regions. Since smaller (M<3) earthquakes are only recorded at higher frequencies where we find larger interstation scatter, amplitude and magnitude estimates for these events are more variable, regional, and path dependent. In this study, we investigate coda amplitude measurements in the Middle East for 2-D variations in attenuation structure.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1368018
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-679156
Journal ID: ISSN 0037-1106
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 106; Journal Issue: 5; Journal ID: ISSN 0037-1106
Publisher:
Seismological Society of America
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES

Citation Formats

Pasyanos, Michael E., Gok, Rengin, and Walter, William R. 2D Variations in Coda Amplitudes in the Middle East. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1785/0120150336.
Pasyanos, Michael E., Gok, Rengin, & Walter, William R. 2D Variations in Coda Amplitudes in the Middle East. United States. doi:10.1785/0120150336.
Pasyanos, Michael E., Gok, Rengin, and Walter, William R. 2016. "2D Variations in Coda Amplitudes in the Middle East". United States. doi:10.1785/0120150336. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1368018.
@article{osti_1368018,
title = {2D Variations in Coda Amplitudes in the Middle East},
author = {Pasyanos, Michael E. and Gok, Rengin and Walter, William R.},
abstractNote = {Here, coda amplitudes have proven to be a stable feature of seismograms, allowing one to reliably measure magnitudes for moderate to large-sized (M≥3) earthquakes over broad regions. Since smaller (M<3) earthquakes are only recorded at higher frequencies where we find larger interstation scatter, amplitude and magnitude estimates for these events are more variable, regional, and path dependent. In this study, we investigate coda amplitude measurements in the Middle East for 2-D variations in attenuation structure.},
doi = {10.1785/0120150336},
journal = {Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America},
number = 5,
volume = 106,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
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