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Title: Big Sky Project Preliminary Results June 28, 2017

Abstract

No abstract provided.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  2. Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1367822
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-25222
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Earth Sciences

Citation Formats

Onishi, Tsubasa, Stauffer, Philip H., Nguyen, Minh, and Carey, James William. Big Sky Project Preliminary Results June 28, 2017. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1367822.
Onishi, Tsubasa, Stauffer, Philip H., Nguyen, Minh, & Carey, James William. Big Sky Project Preliminary Results June 28, 2017. United States. doi:10.2172/1367822.
Onishi, Tsubasa, Stauffer, Philip H., Nguyen, Minh, and Carey, James William. 2017. "Big Sky Project Preliminary Results June 28, 2017". United States. doi:10.2172/1367822. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1367822.
@article{osti_1367822,
title = {Big Sky Project Preliminary Results June 28, 2017},
author = {Onishi, Tsubasa and Stauffer, Philip H. and Nguyen, Minh and Carey, James William},
abstractNote = {No abstract provided.},
doi = {10.2172/1367822},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 6
}

Technical Report:

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  • A trend summary of four Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) monthly samples; MCU-16-122-124 (March 2017), MCU-17-130-132 (April 2017), MCU-17-133-135 (May 2017), and MCU-17-141-149 (June 2017) are reported. Analyses of the June SHT sample (MCU-17-141-149) indicated that the modifier (CS-7SB) and the extractant (MaxCalix) concentrations were slightly below (4% each) their nominal recommended levels (169,000 mg/L and 46,400 mg/L respectively). The suppressor (TiDG) level has decreased since the January 2017 measurement but has remained steady in the range of 666 to 705 mg/L, well above the minimum recommended level (479 mg/L), but below the nominal level. The “flat” trends observed in themore » TiDG, MaxCalix, modifier, and Gamma measurement are consistent with the solvent being idle since January 10, 2017.« less
  • The Young - Rainey STAR Center (Science, Technology, and Research Center) at the Pinellas County, Florida, Site is a former U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility constructed in the mid-1950s. The 96-acre STAR Center is located in Largo, Florida, and lies in the northeast quarter of Section 13, Township 30 South, Range 15 East (Figure 1). While it was owned by DOE, the purpose of the site was to develop and manufacture components for the nation’s nuclear weapons program. In 1987, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) performed a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Assessment (EPA 1988) at themore » site to gather information on potential releases of hazardous materials. In February of 1990, EPA issued a Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments permit to DOE, requiring DOE to investigate and perform remediation activities in those areas designated as solid-waste management units (SWMUs) contaminated by hazardous materials resulting from DOE operations. A total of 17 SWMUs were identified and investigated at the STAR Center. By 1997, 13 of the 17 SWMUs had been remediated or approved for no further action. More recently, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) executed Conditional Site Rehabilitation Completion Orders for the Northeast Site and the Wastewater Neutralization Area on July 27, 2016, stating that no further action is required for those SWMUs. The Building 100 Area (a combination of the Old Drum Storage Site and the Building 100-Industrial Drain Leaks SWMUs) comprises the only two active SWMUs at the STAR Center (Figure 2). This document serves as the semiannual progress report for the SWMUs by providing the results of recent monitoring activities and a summary of ongoing and projected work. The STAR Center is owned by the Pinellas County Industrial Development Authority, but DOE is responsible for remediation activities at the site. Additional background information for the site is contained in the Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Pinellas Site (DOE 2016a). That document and other site-related documents can be accessed at this website: http://www.lm.doe.gov/Pinellas/Sites.aspx.« less
  • This Pinellas County, Florida, Site Environmental Restoration Project Semiannual Progress Report for the 4.5 Acre Site describes environmental restoration activities for the 4.5 Acre Site located in Pinellas County, Largo, Florida (Figure 1). The former U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pinellas Plant facility consisted of the 4.5 Acre Site and what is now the STAR Center (Young - Rainey Science, Technology, and Research Center). Both the 4.5 Acre Site and the STAR Center are part of the overall Pinellas County, Florida, Site (Figure 2). The 4.5 Acre Site is located immediately northwest of the STAR Center, in the northeast quartermore » of Section 13, Township 30 South, Range 15 East. DOE owned this parcel from 1957 to 1972, at which time it was sold to a private landowner. During the period of DOE ownership, the property was used for the disposal of drums of waste resins and solvents. As a result of this practice, the surficial aquifer was impacted by volatile organic compounds (VOCs)—trichloroethene (TCE), cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE), trans-1,2-dichloroethene (tDCE), vinyl chloride (VC), and benzene. Detailed background information for the site is contained in the Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Pinellas Site (DOE 2016). That document and other site-related documents can be accessed at this website: http://www.lm.doe.gov/Pinellas/Sites.aspx. Recent remediation activities consist of the injection of emulsified soybean oil and the microorganism Dehalococcoides mccartyi (formerly known as Dehalococcoides ethenogenes) into the subsurface in February 2010 and again in July 2013 to enhance contaminant biodegradation (hereafter described as bioinjection). Monitoring the performance of these actions, in the form of monitoring well sampling, is ongoing.« less
  • A trend summary of three Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) monthly samples; MCU-16-1488-1493 (December 2016), MCU-17-86-88 (January 2017), and MCU-17-119-121 (February 2017) are reported. Analyses indicate that the modifier (CS-7SB) and the extractant (MaxCalix) concentrations are at their nominal recommended levels (169,000 mg/L and 46,300 mg/L respectively). The suppressor (TiDG) level has decreased to a steady state level of 673 mg/L well above the minimum recommended level (479 mg/L). This analysis confirms the Isopar™ addition to the solvent in January 18, 2017. This analysis also indicates the solvent did not require further additions. Based on the current monthly sample, the levelsmore » of TiDG, Isopar™L, MaxCalix, and modifier are sufficient for continuing operation but are expected to decrease with time. Periodic characterization and trimming additions to the solvent are recommended. No impurities above the 1000 ppm level were found in this solvent by the Semi-Volatile Organic Analysis (SVOA). No impurities were observed in the Hydrogen Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (HNMR). Another impurity observed in the samples was mercury. Up to 38 ± 8 micrograms of mercury per mL of solvent was detected in these samples (the average of the CV-AA and XRF methods). The higher mercury concentration in the solvent (as determined in the last three monthly samples) is possibly due to the higher mercury concentration in Salt Batches 8 and 9 (Tank 49H) or mixing of previously undisturbed areas of high mercury concentration in Tank 49H. The gamma level (0.21E5 dpm/mL) measured in the February SHT sample was one order of magnitude lower than the gamma levels observed in the December and January SHT samples. The February gamma level is consistent with the solvent being idle (since January 10, 2017). The gamma levels observed in the December and January SHT samples were consistent with previous monthly measurements where the process operated normally. The laboratory will continue to monitor the quality of the solvent in particular for any new impurities or degradation of the solvent components.« less
  • A trend summary that includes the last two Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) monthly samples is shown; MCU- 17-150-152 (July SHT) and MCU-17-153-155 (August SHT). Since the last SHT sample sent for analysis was the August sample the chemical state of the solvent is best approximated by the chemical analysis of the August SHT sample (MCU-17-153-155). This report mainly focused on the chemical analysis of the August SHT sample. The analysis data from the July SHT sample are presented in the “trend” plots of this report. Analysis of the August SHT sample (MCU-17-153-155) indicated that the modifier (CS-7SB) was 2% belowmore » but the extractant (MaxCalix) concentration was at its nominal recommended level (169,000 mg/L and 46,400 mg/L respectively). The suppressor (TiDG) level has decreased since the last measurement taken while the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction unit (MCU) was operating in January 2017, but has remained steady in the range of 666 (observed in April) to 715 mg/L (observed in the August 2017 sample) since February 2017, well above the minimum recommended level (479 mg/L), but below the nominal level. The “flat” trends observed in the TiDG, MaxCalix, modifier, and Gamma measurement are consistent with the solvent being idle since January 10, 2017. A strong correlation between density and modifier concentration in the solvent continues to be observed in the SHT samples. This analysis confirms the Isopar™L addition to the solvent in January 2017. This analysis also indicates the solvent did not require further additions. Based on the current monthly sample, the levels of TiDG, Isopar™L, MaxCalix, and modifier are sufficient for continuing operation but are expected to decrease with time if the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) returns to processing radioactive liquid waste. Otherwise, the levels of these components will remain steady. A future Isopar™L trimming addition to the solvent is recommended when MCU resumes processing waste. Two unknown impurities related to the modifier (but not sec-butyl phenol: a modifier degradation product observed before) at the 290 and 110 mg/L levels were observed in the August SHT sample by the Gas - Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) method. They were observed in a second GC-MS re-run with a new column. Their identification can’t be ascertained at this time. No impurities were observed in the Hydrogen Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (HNMR). Another impurity observed in the samples was mercury. Based on the August SHT sample, up to 23 ± 5 micrograms of mercury per mL of solvent was detected (the average of the Cold Vapor-Atomic Adsorption [CV-AA] and X-Ray Fluorescence [XRF] methods). The higher mercury concentration in the solvent (as determined in the last three-monthly samples) is possibly due to either a higher mercury concentration in Salt Batches 8 and 9 (Tank 49H) . The gamma level (~ 2.0E4 dpm/mL) measured in the August SHT samples was one order of magnitude lower than the gamma levels observed in the December 2016 and January 2017 SHT samples. A similar level was observed in the July SHT sample (MCU-SHT-150-152). The gamma level has remained consistently steady since January 10, 2017 when MCU stopped processing radioactive liquid waste. The laboratory will continue to monitor the quality of the solvent in particularly for any new impurities or degradation of the solvent components.« less