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Title: A framework for determining improved placement of current energy converters subject to environmental constraints

Abstract

A modelling framework identifies deployment locations for current-energy-capture devices that maximise power output while minimising potential environmental impacts. The framework, based on the Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code, can incorporate site-specific environmental constraints. Over a 29-day period, energy outputs from three array layouts were estimated for: (1) the preliminary configuration (baseline), (2) an updated configuration that accounted for environmental constraints, (3) and an improved configuration subject to no environmental constraints. Of these layouts, array placement that did not consider environmental constraints extracted the most energy from flow (4.38 MW-hr/day), 19% higher than output from the baseline configuration (3.69 MW-hr/day). Array placement that considered environmental constraints removed 4.27 MW-hr/day of energy (16% more than baseline). In conclusion, this analysis framework accounts for bathymetry and flow-pattern variations that typical experimental studies cannot, demonstrating that it is a valuable tool for identifying improved array layouts for field deployments.

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [3];  [1]
  1. Integral Consulting Inc., Santa Cruz, CA (United States)
  2. Baylor Univ., Waco, TX (United States). Dept. of Geosciences & Mechanical Engineering
  3. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Water Power Technologies Office (EE-4WP)
OSTI Identifier:
1367659
Grant/Contract Number:
NA0003525; AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
International Journal of Sustainable Energy
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 37; Journal Issue: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 1478-6451
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
16 TIDAL AND WAVE POWER; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Marine renewable energy; current-energy conversion; modelling; array layout subject to environmental constraints

Citation Formats

Nelson, Kurt, James, Scott C., Roberts, Jesse D., and Jones, Craig. A framework for determining improved placement of current energy converters subject to environmental constraints. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1080/14786451.2017.1334654.
Nelson, Kurt, James, Scott C., Roberts, Jesse D., & Jones, Craig. A framework for determining improved placement of current energy converters subject to environmental constraints. United States. doi:10.1080/14786451.2017.1334654.
Nelson, Kurt, James, Scott C., Roberts, Jesse D., and Jones, Craig. Mon . "A framework for determining improved placement of current energy converters subject to environmental constraints". United States. doi:10.1080/14786451.2017.1334654.
@article{osti_1367659,
title = {A framework for determining improved placement of current energy converters subject to environmental constraints},
author = {Nelson, Kurt and James, Scott C. and Roberts, Jesse D. and Jones, Craig},
abstractNote = {A modelling framework identifies deployment locations for current-energy-capture devices that maximise power output while minimising potential environmental impacts. The framework, based on the Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code, can incorporate site-specific environmental constraints. Over a 29-day period, energy outputs from three array layouts were estimated for: (1) the preliminary configuration (baseline), (2) an updated configuration that accounted for environmental constraints, (3) and an improved configuration subject to no environmental constraints. Of these layouts, array placement that did not consider environmental constraints extracted the most energy from flow (4.38 MW-hr/day), 19% higher than output from the baseline configuration (3.69 MW-hr/day). Array placement that considered environmental constraints removed 4.27 MW-hr/day of energy (16% more than baseline). In conclusion, this analysis framework accounts for bathymetry and flow-pattern variations that typical experimental studies cannot, demonstrating that it is a valuable tool for identifying improved array layouts for field deployments.},
doi = {10.1080/14786451.2017.1334654},
journal = {International Journal of Sustainable Energy},
number = 7,
volume = 37,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 05 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Jun 05 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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