skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Energetic Condensation Coating Of Cu On Stainless Steel For High Power Couplers, Phase II Final Technical Report

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Alameda Applied Sciences Corporation, San Leandro, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Alameda Applied Sciences Corporation, San Leandro, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1367571
Report Number(s):
DE-SC0009581
DOE Contract Number:
SC0009581
Type / Phase:
SBIR
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; RF couplers; copper coating on stainless steel

Citation Formats

Irfan, Irfan, and Krishnan, Mahadevan. Energetic Condensation Coating Of Cu On Stainless Steel For High Power Couplers, Phase II Final Technical Report. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Irfan, Irfan, & Krishnan, Mahadevan. Energetic Condensation Coating Of Cu On Stainless Steel For High Power Couplers, Phase II Final Technical Report. United States.
Irfan, Irfan, and Krishnan, Mahadevan. 2017. "Energetic Condensation Coating Of Cu On Stainless Steel For High Power Couplers, Phase II Final Technical Report". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1367571,
title = {Energetic Condensation Coating Of Cu On Stainless Steel For High Power Couplers, Phase II Final Technical Report},
author = {Irfan, Irfan and Krishnan, Mahadevan},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 7
}

Technical Report:
This technical report may be protected. To request the document, click here.
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that may hold this item. Keep in mind that many technical reports are not cataloged in WorldCat.

Save / Share:
  • Three thin-wall stainless steel fuel specimens made using fabrication processes and materials similar to the Consumers Big Rock Plant research and development fuel rods were power cycled 3000 times between 500,000 and 75,000 Btu/ hr-ft/sup 2/ in the General Electric Test Reactor (GETR) Trail Cable facility. The fuel specimens were exposed to 1000 psi boiling water. All of the fuel specimens withstood the test without failing or without any significant changes in the clad characteristics. (auth)
  • Space Station elements and advanced military spacecraft will require rejection of tens of kilowatts of waste heat. Large space radiators and two-phase heat transport loops will be required. To minimize radiator size and weight, it is critical to minimize the temperature drop between the heat source and sink. Under an Air Force contract, a unique, high-performance heat exchanger is developed for coupling the radiator to the transport loop. Since fluid flow through the heat exchanger is driven by capillary forces which are easily dominated by gravity forces in ground testing, it is necessary to perform microgravity thermal testing to verifymore » the design. This contract consists of an experiment definition phase leading to a preliminary design and cost estimate for a shuttle-based flight experiment of this heat exchanger design. This program will utilize modified hardware from a ground test program for the heat exchanger.« less
  • This research was performed in support of computations to determine the distribution of hydrogen at a crack tip in an unstable stainless steel. It involved metallographic observations of the distribution of martensite at a stressed crack tip. It is concluded that the martensite phase distribution is much too fine to model realistically by the finite element method when far-field stress effects must be included. The mesh size would have to be less than 50 micrometers in order to include the effects of non-uniform distribution of martensite within a single grain. This would lead to unrealistic computation times. A reasonable compromisemore » is to assume that a finite element will be considered to change from the hydrogen diffusivity of the austenite to that of the bcc martensitic phase when the yield stress of the austenite has been reached. This should give a significantly different hydrogen distribution from the case of untransforming austenite and allow the FEM computations to verify or disprove the kinetic model of hydrogen embrittlement of unstable austenitic stainless steels.« less