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Title: The Cure for Ailing Self-Service Business Intelligence

Abstract

There are many reasons that self-service models fail. Furthermore, these reasons are directly applicable in the management of self-service business inteligence modeling. Our article expands upon the reasons for failure and suggests how self-service models can be made successful through implementation of a centralized approach to development, testing, implementation and support for the delivery of decision making information.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
1367536
Report Number(s):
INL/JOU-16-37697
Journal ID: ISSN 1918-2325
Grant/Contract Number:
AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Business Intelligence Journal
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 21; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 1918-2325
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS; BI Modeling; Business Intelligence; self-service

Citation Formats

Burke, Marsha, Simpson, Wayne, and Staples, Shad. The Cure for Ailing Self-Service Business Intelligence. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Burke, Marsha, Simpson, Wayne, & Staples, Shad. The Cure for Ailing Self-Service Business Intelligence. United States.
Burke, Marsha, Simpson, Wayne, and Staples, Shad. 2016. "The Cure for Ailing Self-Service Business Intelligence". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1367536.
@article{osti_1367536,
title = {The Cure for Ailing Self-Service Business Intelligence},
author = {Burke, Marsha and Simpson, Wayne and Staples, Shad},
abstractNote = {There are many reasons that self-service models fail. Furthermore, these reasons are directly applicable in the management of self-service business inteligence modeling. Our article expands upon the reasons for failure and suggests how self-service models can be made successful through implementation of a centralized approach to development, testing, implementation and support for the delivery of decision making information.},
doi = {},
journal = {Business Intelligence Journal},
number = 3,
volume = 21,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
The DOI is not currently available

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