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Title: Resilience Metrics for the Electric Power System: A Performance-Based Approach.

Abstract

Grid resilience is a concept related to a power system's ability to continue operating and delivering power even in the event that low probability, high-consequence disruptions such as hurricanes, earthquakes, and cyber-attacks occur. Grid resilience objectives focus on managing and, ideally, minimizing potential consequences that occur as a result of these disruptions. Currently, no formal grid resilience definitions, metrics, or analysis methods have been universally accepted. This document describes an effort to develop and describe grid resilience metrics and analysis methods. The metrics and methods described herein extend upon the Resilience Analysis Process (RAP) developed by Watson et al. for the 2015 Quadrennial Energy Review. The extension allows for both outputs from system models and for historical data to serve as the basis for creating grid resilience metrics and informing grid resilience planning and response decision-making. This document describes the grid resilience metrics and analysis methods. Demonstration of the metrics and methods is shown through a set of illustrative use cases.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1367499
Report Number(s):
SAND2017-1493
654236
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION

Citation Formats

Vugrin, Eric D., Castillo, Andrea R, and Silva-Monroy, Cesar Augusto. Resilience Metrics for the Electric Power System: A Performance-Based Approach.. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1367499.
Vugrin, Eric D., Castillo, Andrea R, & Silva-Monroy, Cesar Augusto. Resilience Metrics for the Electric Power System: A Performance-Based Approach.. United States. doi:10.2172/1367499.
Vugrin, Eric D., Castillo, Andrea R, and Silva-Monroy, Cesar Augusto. Wed . "Resilience Metrics for the Electric Power System: A Performance-Based Approach.". United States. doi:10.2172/1367499. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1367499.
@article{osti_1367499,
title = {Resilience Metrics for the Electric Power System: A Performance-Based Approach.},
author = {Vugrin, Eric D. and Castillo, Andrea R and Silva-Monroy, Cesar Augusto},
abstractNote = {Grid resilience is a concept related to a power system's ability to continue operating and delivering power even in the event that low probability, high-consequence disruptions such as hurricanes, earthquakes, and cyber-attacks occur. Grid resilience objectives focus on managing and, ideally, minimizing potential consequences that occur as a result of these disruptions. Currently, no formal grid resilience definitions, metrics, or analysis methods have been universally accepted. This document describes an effort to develop and describe grid resilience metrics and analysis methods. The metrics and methods described herein extend upon the Resilience Analysis Process (RAP) developed by Watson et al. for the 2015 Quadrennial Energy Review. The extension allows for both outputs from system models and for historical data to serve as the basis for creating grid resilience metrics and informing grid resilience planning and response decision-making. This document describes the grid resilience metrics and analysis methods. Demonstration of the metrics and methods is shown through a set of illustrative use cases.},
doi = {10.2172/1367499},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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