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Title: Flowfield Comparisons: Tunnel 9 Case 3745

Abstract

This document compares results for isothermal wall cases and observes their stagnation lines.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1367431
Report Number(s):
SAND2017-5087R
653281
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING

Citation Formats

Wagnild, Ross Martin, Howard, Micah, Smith, Justin, and Kuntz, David W. Flowfield Comparisons: Tunnel 9 Case 3745. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1367431.
Wagnild, Ross Martin, Howard, Micah, Smith, Justin, & Kuntz, David W. Flowfield Comparisons: Tunnel 9 Case 3745. United States. doi:10.2172/1367431.
Wagnild, Ross Martin, Howard, Micah, Smith, Justin, and Kuntz, David W. Mon . "Flowfield Comparisons: Tunnel 9 Case 3745". United States. doi:10.2172/1367431. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1367431.
@article{osti_1367431,
title = {Flowfield Comparisons: Tunnel 9 Case 3745},
author = {Wagnild, Ross Martin and Howard, Micah and Smith, Justin and Kuntz, David W.},
abstractNote = {This document compares results for isothermal wall cases and observes their stagnation lines.},
doi = {10.2172/1367431},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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