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Title: The Gothic shale of the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation Greater Aneth Field (Aneth Unit) Southeastern Utah U.S.A.: Seal for Hydrocarbons and Carbon Dioxide Storage.

Abstract

Greater Aneth oil field, Utah’s largest oil producer, was discovered in 1956 and has produced over 483 million barrels of oil. Located in the Paradox Basin of southeastern Utah, Greater Aneth is a stratigraphic trap producing from the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. Because Greater Aneth is a mature, major oil field in the western U.S., and has a large carbonate reservoir, it was selected to demonstrate combined enhanced oil recovery and carbon dioxide storage. The Aneth Unit in the northwestern part of the field has produced over 160 million barrels of the estimated 386 million barrels of original oil in place—a 42% recovery rate. The large amount of remaining oil made the Aneth Unit ideal to enhance oil recovery by carbon dioxide flooding and demonstrate carbon dioxide storage capacity.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [3]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
  2. Utah Geoglogical Survey, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)
  3. Bereskin and Associates, Salt Lake City (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1367407
Report Number(s):
SAND-2017-4825R
653100
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES

Citation Formats

Heath, Jason E., Dewers, Thomas, Chidsey, Thomas C., Carney, Stephanie M., and Bereskin, S. R.. The Gothic shale of the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation Greater Aneth Field (Aneth Unit) Southeastern Utah U.S.A.: Seal for Hydrocarbons and Carbon Dioxide Storage.. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1367407.
Heath, Jason E., Dewers, Thomas, Chidsey, Thomas C., Carney, Stephanie M., & Bereskin, S. R.. The Gothic shale of the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation Greater Aneth Field (Aneth Unit) Southeastern Utah U.S.A.: Seal for Hydrocarbons and Carbon Dioxide Storage.. United States. doi:10.2172/1367407.
Heath, Jason E., Dewers, Thomas, Chidsey, Thomas C., Carney, Stephanie M., and Bereskin, S. R.. 2017. "The Gothic shale of the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation Greater Aneth Field (Aneth Unit) Southeastern Utah U.S.A.: Seal for Hydrocarbons and Carbon Dioxide Storage.". United States. doi:10.2172/1367407. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1367407.
@article{osti_1367407,
title = {The Gothic shale of the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation Greater Aneth Field (Aneth Unit) Southeastern Utah U.S.A.: Seal for Hydrocarbons and Carbon Dioxide Storage.},
author = {Heath, Jason E. and Dewers, Thomas and Chidsey, Thomas C. and Carney, Stephanie M. and Bereskin, S. R.},
abstractNote = {Greater Aneth oil field, Utah’s largest oil producer, was discovered in 1956 and has produced over 483 million barrels of oil. Located in the Paradox Basin of southeastern Utah, Greater Aneth is a stratigraphic trap producing from the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. Because Greater Aneth is a mature, major oil field in the western U.S., and has a large carbonate reservoir, it was selected to demonstrate combined enhanced oil recovery and carbon dioxide storage. The Aneth Unit in the northwestern part of the field has produced over 160 million barrels of the estimated 386 million barrels of original oil in place—a 42% recovery rate. The large amount of remaining oil made the Aneth Unit ideal to enhance oil recovery by carbon dioxide flooding and demonstrate carbon dioxide storage capacity.},
doi = {10.2172/1367407},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 5
}

Technical Report:

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  • Since discovery of the Aneth field (1956), 360 million barrels of oil have been produced from Middle Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) carbonates of the lower Ismay and Desert Creek intervals. The carbonate platform spans an area of approximately 100 mi{sup 2} and is composed of repetitive shoaling cycles (parasequences). A greater understanding of the depositional environments and diagenesis within a sequence stratigraphic framework can lead to improved operational efficiency through better prediction and identification by bypassed, banked, and/or undeveloped oil. Parasequence sets (up to 150 ft thick) are recognized only within aggradational and progradational highstand systems tracts and are comprised of 3more » to 5 stacked parasequences (10-50 ft thick). Repetitive facies successions include deep water lime mudstone and skeletal wackestone that grade up into shallow water phylloid algal buildups, peloidal/skeletal packstone, and oolitic grainstone. Shoal water facies have the best reservoir porosity and reveal preserved primary pore systems that are secondarily enhanced by fresh water leaching of less stable carbonate mineralogies. Distinctive facies stacking patterns and associated vertical diagenetic trends resulted in the formation of highly stratified Desert Creek and Ismay reservoirs. Porosity and permeability are developed at the top of parasequences. Sequence stratigraphy provides a framework for more insightful correlation and mapping of genetically related facies that comprise these stratified reservoirs. Cursory examination of similar Pennsylvania carbonate reservoirs in west Texas suggests and analogous approach for understanding reservoir stratigraphy could be applied with success.« less
  • Infill drilling, workovers, and extremely low decline rates proved existing geological models were inadequate to explain reservoir performance. A three dimensional geological model was built using all available geological and reservoir data. The model combined with reservoir engineering analysis has been used to identify workover locations, horizontal well locations, and is being used in an ongoing study for CO{sub 2} flooding the reservoir.
  • Sequence stratigraphic analysis is used to characterize stratified Middle Pennsylvanian carbonate reservoirs of the McElmo Creek Unit in the Greater Aneth field, southeastern Utah. This approach has led to: (1) a better understanding of platform-to-basin correlations and associated performance anomalies, (2) a better understanding of interwell heterogeneity related to changes in depositional facies, (3) unit-wide mapping of time-equivalent geologic layers, (4) prediction of reservoir quality by relating deposition and early diagenesis, and (5) a first-pass evaluation of flow zones. The sequence stratigraphic approach is divided into three aspects: the sequence stratigraphic framework, the stratigraphic layer model, and predictive geology. Themore » sequence stratigraphic framework is established to identify major chronostratigraphic surfaces (e.g., sequence boundaries and flooding surfaces) that constrain correlation of high-frequency depositional cycles. The stratigraphic layer model describes the architecture of high-frequency depositional cyclicity. Nineteen parasequences (i.e., stratigraphic layers or depositional cycles) are described within the Desert Creek and lower Ismay section at McElmo Creek. Time-slice mapping of these synchronous layers and of the facies contained within the layers provides the basis for predicting the distribution and continuity of reservoirs (i.e. predictive geology). A regionally extensive, low-relief tidal flat serves as the stratigraphic datum. Successively younger layers are added to the datum. Each layer top mimics the paleodepositional topography, and the consequent depositional geometry is used to predict facies within each layer. Geologic maps and cross sections illustrate facies distribution and predict reservoir quality and continuity within each depositional layer. Examples relate reservoir performance to facies changes and associated changes in the pore architecture.« less
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