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Title: Stoichiometric Network Analysis of Cyanobacterial Acclimation to Photosynthesis-Associated Stresses Identifies Heterotrophic Niches

Abstract

Metabolic models used to simulate the mass and energy balances associated with cyanobacterial stress and production of substrates for heterotrophic microbes

Authors:
; ORCiD logo;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1367375
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-123196
Journal ID: ISSN 2227-9717; 49356; KP1601010
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Processes; Journal Volume: 5; Journal Issue: 2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
cross-feeding; cyanobacteria; elementary flux mode analysis; irradiance; resource allocation; RuBisCO; stress acclimation; Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Beck, Ashley, Bernstein, Hans, and Carlson, Ross. Stoichiometric Network Analysis of Cyanobacterial Acclimation to Photosynthesis-Associated Stresses Identifies Heterotrophic Niches. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3390/pr5020032.
Beck, Ashley, Bernstein, Hans, & Carlson, Ross. Stoichiometric Network Analysis of Cyanobacterial Acclimation to Photosynthesis-Associated Stresses Identifies Heterotrophic Niches. United States. doi:10.3390/pr5020032.
Beck, Ashley, Bernstein, Hans, and Carlson, Ross. 2017. "Stoichiometric Network Analysis of Cyanobacterial Acclimation to Photosynthesis-Associated Stresses Identifies Heterotrophic Niches". United States. doi:10.3390/pr5020032.
@article{osti_1367375,
title = {Stoichiometric Network Analysis of Cyanobacterial Acclimation to Photosynthesis-Associated Stresses Identifies Heterotrophic Niches},
author = {Beck, Ashley and Bernstein, Hans and Carlson, Ross},
abstractNote = {Metabolic models used to simulate the mass and energy balances associated with cyanobacterial stress and production of substrates for heterotrophic microbes},
doi = {10.3390/pr5020032},
journal = {Processes},
number = 2,
volume = 5,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 6
}
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