skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Compensating for Parasitic Voltage Drops in Resistive Memory Arrays.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1367275
Report Number(s):
SAND2017-5376C
653440
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the 2017 IEEE International Memory Workshop held May 14-17, 2017 in Monterey, CA.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Agarwal, Sapan, Schiek, Richard, and Marinella, Matthew. Compensating for Parasitic Voltage Drops in Resistive Memory Arrays.. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1109/IMW.2017.7939075.
Agarwal, Sapan, Schiek, Richard, & Marinella, Matthew. Compensating for Parasitic Voltage Drops in Resistive Memory Arrays.. United States. doi:10.1109/IMW.2017.7939075.
Agarwal, Sapan, Schiek, Richard, and Marinella, Matthew. Mon . "Compensating for Parasitic Voltage Drops in Resistive Memory Arrays.". United States. doi:10.1109/IMW.2017.7939075. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1367275.
@article{osti_1367275,
title = {Compensating for Parasitic Voltage Drops in Resistive Memory Arrays.},
author = {Agarwal, Sapan and Schiek, Richard and Marinella, Matthew},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {10.1109/IMW.2017.7939075},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share:
  • Abstract not provided.
  • Abstract not provided.
  • Solar cells at potentials positive with respect to a surrounding plasma collect electrons. Current is collected by the exposed high voltage surfaces: the interconnects and the sides of the solar cells. This current is a drain on the array power that can be significant for high-voltage arrays. In addition, this current influences the current balance that determines the floating potential of the spacecraft. One of the objectives of the Air Force (PL/GPS) PASP Plus experiment is an improved understanding of parasitic current collection. As part of the PASP Plus program, the authors are using computer modeling to improve their understandingmore » of the physical processes that control parasitic current collection.« less
  • Solar cells at potentials positive with respect to a surrounding plasma collect electrons. Current is collected by the exposed high voltage surfaces: the interconnects and the sides of the solar cells. This current is a drain on the array power that can be significant for high-voltage arrays. In addition, this current influences the current balance that determines the floating potential of the spacecraft. One of the objects of the Air Force (PL/GPS) PASP Plus experiment is an improved understanding of parasitic current collection. As part of the PASP Plus program, the authors are using computer modeling to improve their understandingmore » of the physical processes that control parasitic current collection. They have done detailed calculations for a range of geometries, LEO plasma conditions, applied potential, and material parameters. From the results of the detailed calculations, they have developed simple formulas for the current collected as a function of applied voltage, plasma conditions, and geometry. They are using flight results to validate this approach and the resulting formulas.« less
  • Solar cells at potentials positive with respect to a surrounding plasma collect electrons. Current is collected by the exposed high voltage surfaces: the interconnects and the sides of the solar cells. This current is a drain on the array power that can be significant for high-power arrays. In addition, this current influences the current balance that determines the floating potential of the spacecraft. One of the objectives of the Air Force (PL/GPS) PASP Plus (Photovoltaic Array Space Power Plus Diagnostics) experiment is an improved understanding of parasitic current collection. The authors have done computer modeling of parasitic current collection andmore » have examined current collection flight data from the first year of operations. Prior to the flight they did computer modeling to improve their understanding of the physical processes that control parasitic current collection. At high potentials, the current rapidly rises due to a phenomenon called snapover. Under snapover conditions, the equilibrium potential distribution across the dielectric surface is such that part of the area is at potentials greater than the first crossover of the secondary yield curve. Therefore, each incident electron generates more than one secondary electron. The net effect is that the high potential area and the collecting area increase. The authors did two-dimensional calculations for the various geometries to be flown. The calculations span the space of anticipated plasma conditions, applied potential, and material parameters. They used the calculations and early flight data to develop an analytic formula for the dependence of the current on the primary problem variables. The analytic formula was incorporated into the EPSAT computer code. EPSAT allows the authors to easily extend the results to other conditions. PASP Plus is the principal experiment integrated onto the Advanced Photovoltaic and Electronics Experiments (APEX) satellite bus.« less