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Title: Understanding Friction in MoS2 Part 2: Water Oxidation and Run-in.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1367183
Report Number(s):
SAND2017-5128C
653313
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the AVS 63rd International Symposium & Exhibition 2016 held November 6-11, 2016 in Nashville, Tennessee, United States.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Curry, John, Chandross, Michael E., Babuska, Tomas Farley, Strandwitz, Nick C., Luftman, Henry S., Dugger, Michael T., Argibay, Nicolas, and Krick, Brandon A.. Understanding Friction in MoS2 Part 2: Water Oxidation and Run-in.. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Curry, John, Chandross, Michael E., Babuska, Tomas Farley, Strandwitz, Nick C., Luftman, Henry S., Dugger, Michael T., Argibay, Nicolas, & Krick, Brandon A.. Understanding Friction in MoS2 Part 2: Water Oxidation and Run-in.. United States.
Curry, John, Chandross, Michael E., Babuska, Tomas Farley, Strandwitz, Nick C., Luftman, Henry S., Dugger, Michael T., Argibay, Nicolas, and Krick, Brandon A.. Mon . "Understanding Friction in MoS2 Part 2: Water Oxidation and Run-in.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1367183.
@article{osti_1367183,
title = {Understanding Friction in MoS2 Part 2: Water Oxidation and Run-in.},
author = {Curry, John and Chandross, Michael E. and Babuska, Tomas Farley and Strandwitz, Nick C. and Luftman, Henry S. and Dugger, Michael T. and Argibay, Nicolas and Krick, Brandon A.},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Conference:
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  • Abstract not provided.
  • The objectives of this report are: (1) Investigate the catalysis of water oxidation by cobalt and manganese hydrous oxides immobilized on titania or silica nanoparticles, and dinuclear metal complexes with quinonoid ligands in order to develop a better understanding of the critical water oxidation chemistry, and rationally search for improved catalysts. (2) Optimize the light-harvesting and charge-separation abilities of stable semiconductors including both a focused effort to improve the best existing materials by investigating their structural and electronic properties using a full suite of characterization tools, and a parallel effort to discover and characterize new materials. (3) Combine these elementsmore » to examine the function of oxidation catalysts on Band-Gap-Narrowed Semiconductor (BGNSC) surfaces and elucidate the core scientific challenges to the efficient coupling of the materials functions.« less
  • In supercritical water oxidation, dilute aqueous organic wastes are oxidized at temperatures and pressures above the critical point of water. This process has been successfully demonstrated to treat waste streams of interest to the Department of Energy production facilities. In this paper we present a numerical study on the oxidation kinetics of a waste containing 98% water and 2% methanol under supercritical conditions. The plug-flow reactor model is similar to that presented in an earlier publication. We have corrected the chemistry in this model by changing the reaction rates of unimolecular reactions to their high-pressure limits. Our results show thatmore » the decomposition step of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} into the OH radical is the dominant reaction step controlling the destruction of methanol under supercritical conditions. Using the corrected chemistry model, we calculate the characteristic destruction times of methanol as a function of reactor inlet conditions.« less
  • Different types of vibrations induced by dry friction are investigated by means of a model apparatus described in Part 1. The structural model is obtained from the measurement of the modal frequencies and damping ratios of three degrees of freedom. The oscillations in the normal and frictional forces, as well as the slider vibrations, have been measured and analyzed. As the normal load is increased, four different regions of vibrations are observed corresponding to the four friction regimes discussed in a companion paper. Small oscillations are encountered at low values of the normal load and they are possibly caused bymore » random surface irregularities. The vibration characteristics are changed when transition occurs from steady state friction. When the normal load is further increased, self-excited periodic vibrations are produced. The spectra of the oscillations are related to the modal frequencies. Self-excited vibrations are analyzed on the basis of the experimental data. 12 references, 6 figures, 1 table.« less
  • No abstract prepared.