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Title: Bioenergy sorghum crop model predicts VPD-limited transpiration traits enhance biomass yield in water-limited environments

Abstract

Bioenergy sorghum is targeted for production in water-limited annual cropland therefore traits that improve plant water capture, water use efficiency, and resilience to water deficit are necessary to maximize productivity. A crop modeling framework, APSIM, was adapted to predict the growth and biomass yield of energy sorghum and to identify potentially useful traits for crop improvement. APSIM simulations of energy sorghum development and biomass accumulation replicated results from field experiments across multiple years, patterns of rainfall, and irrigation schemes. Modeling showed that energy sorghum’s long duration of vegetative growth increased water capture and biomass yield by ~30% compared to short season crops in a water-limited production region. Additionally, APSIM was extended to enable modeling of VPD-limited transpiration traits that reduce crop water use under high vapor pressure deficits (VPDs). The response of transpiration rate to increasing VPD was modeled as a linear response until a VPD threshold was reached, at which the slope of the response decreases, representing a range of responses to VPD observed in sorghum germplasm. Simulation results indicated that the VPD-limited transpiration trait is most beneficial in hot and dry regions of production where crops are exposed to extended periods without rainfall during the season or tomore » a terminal drought. In these environments, slower but more efficient transpiration increases biomass yield and prevents or delays the exhaustion of soil water and onset of leaf senescence. The VPD-limited transpiration responses observed in sorghum germplasm increased biomass accumulation by 20% in years with lower summer rainfall, and the ability to drastically reduce transpiration under high VPD conditions could increase biomass by 6% on average across all years. This work indicates that the productivity and resilience of bioenergy sorghum grown in water-limited environments could be further enhanced by development of genotypes with optimized VPD-limited transpiration traits and deployment of these crops in water limited growing environments. As a result, the energy sorghum model and VPD-limited transpiration trait implementation aremade available to simulate performance in other target environments.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1367176
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0012629; FC02-07ER64494; AR0000596
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Frontiers in Plant Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 1664-462X
Publisher:
Frontiers Research Foundation
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 09 BIOMASS FUELS; energy sorghum; vapor pressure deficit; limited transpiration; crop model; water-limited environments; biomass; APSIM

Citation Formats

Truong, Sandra K., McCormick, Ryan F., and Mullet, John E. Bioenergy sorghum crop model predicts VPD-limited transpiration traits enhance biomass yield in water-limited environments. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3389/fpls.2017.00335.
Truong, Sandra K., McCormick, Ryan F., & Mullet, John E. Bioenergy sorghum crop model predicts VPD-limited transpiration traits enhance biomass yield in water-limited environments. United States. doi:10.3389/fpls.2017.00335.
Truong, Sandra K., McCormick, Ryan F., and Mullet, John E. Tue . "Bioenergy sorghum crop model predicts VPD-limited transpiration traits enhance biomass yield in water-limited environments". United States. doi:10.3389/fpls.2017.00335. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1367176.
@article{osti_1367176,
title = {Bioenergy sorghum crop model predicts VPD-limited transpiration traits enhance biomass yield in water-limited environments},
author = {Truong, Sandra K. and McCormick, Ryan F. and Mullet, John E.},
abstractNote = {Bioenergy sorghum is targeted for production in water-limited annual cropland therefore traits that improve plant water capture, water use efficiency, and resilience to water deficit are necessary to maximize productivity. A crop modeling framework, APSIM, was adapted to predict the growth and biomass yield of energy sorghum and to identify potentially useful traits for crop improvement. APSIM simulations of energy sorghum development and biomass accumulation replicated results from field experiments across multiple years, patterns of rainfall, and irrigation schemes. Modeling showed that energy sorghum’s long duration of vegetative growth increased water capture and biomass yield by ~30% compared to short season crops in a water-limited production region. Additionally, APSIM was extended to enable modeling of VPD-limited transpiration traits that reduce crop water use under high vapor pressure deficits (VPDs). The response of transpiration rate to increasing VPD was modeled as a linear response until a VPD threshold was reached, at which the slope of the response decreases, representing a range of responses to VPD observed in sorghum germplasm. Simulation results indicated that the VPD-limited transpiration trait is most beneficial in hot and dry regions of production where crops are exposed to extended periods without rainfall during the season or to a terminal drought. In these environments, slower but more efficient transpiration increases biomass yield and prevents or delays the exhaustion of soil water and onset of leaf senescence. The VPD-limited transpiration responses observed in sorghum germplasm increased biomass accumulation by 20% in years with lower summer rainfall, and the ability to drastically reduce transpiration under high VPD conditions could increase biomass by 6% on average across all years. This work indicates that the productivity and resilience of bioenergy sorghum grown in water-limited environments could be further enhanced by development of genotypes with optimized VPD-limited transpiration traits and deployment of these crops in water limited growing environments. As a result, the energy sorghum model and VPD-limited transpiration trait implementation aremade available to simulate performance in other target environments.},
doi = {10.3389/fpls.2017.00335},
journal = {Frontiers in Plant Science},
number = ,
volume = 8,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Mar 21 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Mar 21 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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