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Title: Comparison and validation of acoustic response models for wind noise reduction pipe arrays

Abstract

The detection capability of the infrasound component of the International Monitoring System (IMS) is tightly linked to the performance of its wind noise reduction systems. The wind noise reduction solution implemented at all IMS infrasound measurement systems consists of a spatial distribution of air inlets connected to the infrasound sensor through a network of pipes. This system, usually referred to as “pipe array,” has proven its efficiency in operational conditions. The objective of this paper is to present the results of the comparison and validation of three distinct acoustic response models for pipe arrays. The characteristics of the models and the results obtained for a defined set of pipe array configurations are described. A field experiment using a newly developed infrasound generator, dedicated to the validation of these models, is then presented. The comparison between the modeled and empirical acoustic responses shows that two of the three models can be confidently used to estimate pipe array acoustic responses. Lastly, this study paves the way to the deconvolution of IMS infrasound data from pipe array responses and to the optimization of pipe array design to IMS applications.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [1]
  1. CTBTO, Vienna (Austria)
  2. CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon (France)
  3. The Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)
  4. Univ. of Hawai'i at Manoa, Kailua-Kona, HI (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Office of Nonproliferation and Verification Research and Development (NA-22)
Contributing Org.:
CTBTO, Vienna, Austria CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon, France Applied Research Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania Infrasound Laboratory, University of Hawai‘i at Manoa, Kailua-Kona, Hawaii
OSTI Identifier:
1367159
Grant/Contract Number:
NA0002534
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 34; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 0739-0572
Publisher:
American Meteorological Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; acoustic measurements/effects; infrasound; wind effects

Citation Formats

Marty, Julien, Denis, Stéphane, Gabrielson, Thomas, Garcés, Milton, and Brown, David. Comparison and validation of acoustic response models for wind noise reduction pipe arrays. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1175/JTECH-D-16-0118.1.
Marty, Julien, Denis, Stéphane, Gabrielson, Thomas, Garcés, Milton, & Brown, David. Comparison and validation of acoustic response models for wind noise reduction pipe arrays. United States. doi:10.1175/JTECH-D-16-0118.1.
Marty, Julien, Denis, Stéphane, Gabrielson, Thomas, Garcés, Milton, and Brown, David. Mon . "Comparison and validation of acoustic response models for wind noise reduction pipe arrays". United States. doi:10.1175/JTECH-D-16-0118.1. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1367159.
@article{osti_1367159,
title = {Comparison and validation of acoustic response models for wind noise reduction pipe arrays},
author = {Marty, Julien and Denis, Stéphane and Gabrielson, Thomas and Garcés, Milton and Brown, David},
abstractNote = {The detection capability of the infrasound component of the International Monitoring System (IMS) is tightly linked to the performance of its wind noise reduction systems. The wind noise reduction solution implemented at all IMS infrasound measurement systems consists of a spatial distribution of air inlets connected to the infrasound sensor through a network of pipes. This system, usually referred to as “pipe array,” has proven its efficiency in operational conditions. The objective of this paper is to present the results of the comparison and validation of three distinct acoustic response models for pipe arrays. The characteristics of the models and the results obtained for a defined set of pipe array configurations are described. A field experiment using a newly developed infrasound generator, dedicated to the validation of these models, is then presented. The comparison between the modeled and empirical acoustic responses shows that two of the three models can be confidently used to estimate pipe array acoustic responses. Lastly, this study paves the way to the deconvolution of IMS infrasound data from pipe array responses and to the optimization of pipe array design to IMS applications.},
doi = {10.1175/JTECH-D-16-0118.1},
journal = {Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology},
number = 2,
volume = 34,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 13 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Mon Feb 13 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

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