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Title: Formation of metal clusters in halloysite clay nanotubes

Abstract

We developed ceramic core-shell materials based on abundant halloysite clay nanotubes with enhanced heavy metal ions loading through Schiff base binding. These clay tubes are formed by rolling alumosilicate sheets and have diameter of c.50 nm, a lumen of 15 nm and length ~1 μm. This allowed for synthesis of metal nanoparticles at the selected position: (1) on the outer surface seeding 3-5 nm metal particles on the tubes; (2) inside the tube’s central lumen resulting in 10-12 nm diameter metal cores shelled with ceramic wall; and (3) smaller metal nanoparticles intercalated in the tube’s wall allowing up to 9 wt% of Ru, and Ag loading. These composite materials have high surface area providing a good support for catalytic nanoparticles, and can also be used for sorption of metal ions from aqueous solutions.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [3]
  1. I. Gubkin Russian State Univ. of Oil and Gas, Moscow (Russia). Dept. of Physical and Colloid Chemistry
  2. WPI International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (WPI-MANA), Tsukuba (Japan). National Inst. for Materials Science
  3. Louisiana Tech Univ., Ruston, LA (United States). Inst. for Micromanufacturing
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Louisiana Tech Univ., Ruston, LA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC); Russian Science Foundation
OSTI Identifier:
1367146
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0012432; 14-19-01045
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Science and Technology of Advanced Materials
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 18; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 1468-6996
Publisher:
IOP Publishing
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; Halloysite nanotubes; metals intercalation; core-shell; clay

Citation Formats

Vinokurov, Vladimir A., Stavitskaya, Anna V., Chudakov, Yaroslav A., Ivanov, Evgenii V., Shrestha, Lok Kumar, Ariga, Katsuhiko, Darrat, Yusuf A., and Lvov, Yuri M. Formation of metal clusters in halloysite clay nanotubes. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1080/14686996.2016.1278352.
Vinokurov, Vladimir A., Stavitskaya, Anna V., Chudakov, Yaroslav A., Ivanov, Evgenii V., Shrestha, Lok Kumar, Ariga, Katsuhiko, Darrat, Yusuf A., & Lvov, Yuri M. Formation of metal clusters in halloysite clay nanotubes. United States. doi:10.1080/14686996.2016.1278352.
Vinokurov, Vladimir A., Stavitskaya, Anna V., Chudakov, Yaroslav A., Ivanov, Evgenii V., Shrestha, Lok Kumar, Ariga, Katsuhiko, Darrat, Yusuf A., and Lvov, Yuri M. Thu . "Formation of metal clusters in halloysite clay nanotubes". United States. doi:10.1080/14686996.2016.1278352. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1367146.
@article{osti_1367146,
title = {Formation of metal clusters in halloysite clay nanotubes},
author = {Vinokurov, Vladimir A. and Stavitskaya, Anna V. and Chudakov, Yaroslav A. and Ivanov, Evgenii V. and Shrestha, Lok Kumar and Ariga, Katsuhiko and Darrat, Yusuf A. and Lvov, Yuri M.},
abstractNote = {We developed ceramic core-shell materials based on abundant halloysite clay nanotubes with enhanced heavy metal ions loading through Schiff base binding. These clay tubes are formed by rolling alumosilicate sheets and have diameter of c.50 nm, a lumen of 15 nm and length ~1 μm. This allowed for synthesis of metal nanoparticles at the selected position: (1) on the outer surface seeding 3-5 nm metal particles on the tubes; (2) inside the tube’s central lumen resulting in 10-12 nm diameter metal cores shelled with ceramic wall; and (3) smaller metal nanoparticles intercalated in the tube’s wall allowing up to 9 wt% of Ru, and Ag loading. These composite materials have high surface area providing a good support for catalytic nanoparticles, and can also be used for sorption of metal ions from aqueous solutions.},
doi = {10.1080/14686996.2016.1278352},
journal = {Science and Technology of Advanced Materials},
number = 1,
volume = 18,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 16 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Thu Feb 16 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 8works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • The light weight and compact hydrogen storage materials is still prerequisite for the carbon free hydrogen fuel cell technology. In this work, the hydrogen storage performance of acid treated halloysite clay nanotubes (A-HNTs) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanoparticles decorated acid treated halloysite nanoclay composite (A-HNT-h-BN) are demonstrated, where facile ultrasonic technique is adopted for the synthesis of A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite. Hydrogen storage studies were carried out using Sieverts-like hydrogenation setup. The A-HNTs and A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite were analyzed by XRD, FTIR, HRTEM, EDX, CHNS-elemental analysis and TGA. The A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite shows superior storage capacity of 2.19 wt% atmore » 50 °C compared to the A-HNTs (0.58 wt%). A 100% desorption of stored hydrogen is noted in the temperature range of 138–175 °C. The average binding energy of hydrogen was found to be 0.34 eV for the prepared A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite. The excellent storage capability of A-HNT-h-BN nanoclay composite towards hydrogen at ambient temperature may find bright perspective in hydrogen fuel cell technology in near future.« less
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