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Title: A model combustor for studying a reacting jet in an oscillating crossflow

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [3]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907, USA
  2. Siemens Energy, Inc., Orlando, Florida 32817, USA
  3. School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907, USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1366553
Grant/Contract Number:
FE0007099
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Review of Scientific Instruments
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 88; Journal Issue: 6; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-11-16 11:09:55; Journal ID: ISSN 0034-6748
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Fugger, Christopher A., Gejji, Rohan M., Portillo, J. Enrique, Yu, Yen, Lucht, Robert P., and Anderson, William E.. A model combustor for studying a reacting jet in an oscillating crossflow. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4978415.
Fugger, Christopher A., Gejji, Rohan M., Portillo, J. Enrique, Yu, Yen, Lucht, Robert P., & Anderson, William E.. A model combustor for studying a reacting jet in an oscillating crossflow. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4978415.
Fugger, Christopher A., Gejji, Rohan M., Portillo, J. Enrique, Yu, Yen, Lucht, Robert P., and Anderson, William E.. Thu . "A model combustor for studying a reacting jet in an oscillating crossflow". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4978415.
@article{osti_1366553,
title = {A model combustor for studying a reacting jet in an oscillating crossflow},
author = {Fugger, Christopher A. and Gejji, Rohan M. and Portillo, J. Enrique and Yu, Yen and Lucht, Robert P. and Anderson, William E.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1063/1.4978415},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 6,
volume = 88,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1063/1.4978415

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  • This paper presents flow behavior with an oscillating motion of an impinging jet upon a flame dome head and its reattachment to the casing wall, when a distorted flow is provided at the inlet of the dump diffuser combustor. A Laser-Doppler Velocimeter was used for the measurements of the time-averaged flow within a sudden expansion region. A surface pressure fluctuation survey on the flame dome head and flow visualization by a smoke wire technique with a high-speed video camera were conducted from the viewpoint of the unsteady flow features of the impinging jet. There exists a high-vorticity region at themore » jet boundary, resulting in the production of turbulence kinetic energy. In particular, higher vorticity is observed in the higher velocity side of the jet. The jet near the dome head has favorable characteristics about the flow rate distribution into the branched channel. Reynolds shear stress and turbulence energy are produced near the reattachment region. The jet has an oscillating motion near the dome head with asymmetric vortex formation at the jet boundary.« less
  • Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes models are not very accurate for high-Reynolds-number compressible jet-in-crossflow interactions. The inaccuracy arises from the use of inappropriate model parameters and model-form errors in the Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes model. In this study, the hypothesis is pursued that Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes predictions can be significantly improved by using parameters inferred from experimental measurements of a supersonic jet interacting with a transonic crossflow.
  • In this paper, we demonstrate a statistical procedure for learning a high-order eddy viscosity model (EVM) from experimental data and using it to improve the predictive skill of a Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) simulator. The method is tested in a three-dimensional (3D), transonic jet-in-crossflow (JIC) configuration. The process starts with a cubic eddy viscosity model (CEVM) developed for incompressible flows. It is fitted to limited experimental JIC data using shrinkage regression. The shrinkage process removes all the terms from the model, except an intercept, a linear term, and a quadratic one involving the square of the vorticity. The shrunk eddy viscositymore » model is implemented in an RANS simulator and calibrated, using vorticity measurements, to infer three parameters. The calibration is Bayesian and is solved using a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. A 3D probability density distribution for the inferred parameters is constructed, thus quantifying the uncertainty in the estimate. The phenomenal cost of using a 3D flow simulator inside an MCMC loop is mitigated by using surrogate models (“curve-fits”). A support vector machine classifier (SVMC) is used to impose our prior belief regarding parameter values, specifically to exclude nonphysical parameter combinations. The calibrated model is compared, in terms of its predictive skill, to simulations using uncalibrated linear and CEVMs. Finally, we find that the calibrated model, with one quadratic term, is more accurate than the uncalibrated simulator. The model is also checked at a flow condition at which the model was not calibrated.« less
  • Abstract not provided.