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Title: Influence of site and soil properties on the DRIFT spectra of northern cold-region soils [Influence of site and soil properties on the mid-infrared spectra of northern cold-region soils]

Abstract

Here, we investigated the influence of site characteristics and soil properties on the chemical composition of organic matter in soils collected from a latitudinal transect across Alaska through analysis of diffuse reflectance Fourier transform mid infrared (MidIR) spectra of bulk soils. The study included 119 soil samples collected from 28 sites including tundra, boreal forest, and grassland ecosystems. Organic, mineral, and cryoturbated soil horizons, both seasonally and perennially frozen, from a variety of depths and edaphic conditions were examined. The amount and chemical composition of organic matter as well as site and soil properties exerted a strong influence on the MidIR spectra. The spectra were highly sensitive to the extent of organic matter decomposition, enabling the ordination of Oi, Oe and Oa organic horizons. Differences in absorbance intensity for several spectral bands indicated that Oi horizons contained greater abundance of relatively fresh residues, phenolic-OH compounds, aliphatic compounds (waxes, lipids and fats), and carbohydrates. In contrast, Oa horizons had a greater presence of amide groups (possibly from microbial residues), aromatics, C=C bonds, carboxylates and carboxylic acids. Another significant factor differentiating these horizons was the incorporation of clays and silicates into the decomposing organic matter of Oa horizons. Calculated height peak ratiosmore » showed a clear trend to greater decomposition among Oi, Oe and Oa. The MidIR spectra were related to many site/soil attributes including land cover type, parent material, and associated factors, such as permafrost presence/absence, soil drainage, horizon depth, bulk density, cation exchange capacity, and pH. Single MidIR spectral bands were identified that might be used in future studies to quickly estimate the organic and inorganic carbon, total nitrogen, and carbon:nitrogen ratios of soils from northern latitudes. Lastly, our results demonstrate that the information contained in MidIR spectra of bulk soil integrates the quantity and chemical composition of soil organic matter with soil forming factors and highlights the potential for using this information to assess the degradation state of organic matter stored in northern cold-region soils.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [1];  [4];  [1];  [4]
  1. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Lemont, IL (United States)
  2. USDA-ARS, Akron, CO (United States)
  3. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Lemont, IL (United States); USDA-ARS, Las Cruces, NM (United States)
  4. Univ. of Alaska Fairbanks, Palmer, AK (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Agricultural Research Service; USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23), Terrestrial Ecosystem Science
OSTI Identifier:
1366531
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Geoderma
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 305; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0016-7061
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; carbon; decomposition state; mid infrared spectroscopy; northern soils; soil forming factors; DRIFT; soil organic matters

Citation Formats

Matamala, Roser, Calderon, Francisco J., Jastrow, Julie D., Fan, Zhaosheng, Hofmann, Scott M., Michaelson, Gary J., Mishra, Umakant, and Ping, Chien -Lu. Influence of site and soil properties on the DRIFT spectra of northern cold-region soils [Influence of site and soil properties on the mid-infrared spectra of northern cold-region soils]. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.geoderma.2017.05.014.
Matamala, Roser, Calderon, Francisco J., Jastrow, Julie D., Fan, Zhaosheng, Hofmann, Scott M., Michaelson, Gary J., Mishra, Umakant, & Ping, Chien -Lu. Influence of site and soil properties on the DRIFT spectra of northern cold-region soils [Influence of site and soil properties on the mid-infrared spectra of northern cold-region soils]. United States. doi:10.1016/j.geoderma.2017.05.014.
Matamala, Roser, Calderon, Francisco J., Jastrow, Julie D., Fan, Zhaosheng, Hofmann, Scott M., Michaelson, Gary J., Mishra, Umakant, and Ping, Chien -Lu. Mon . "Influence of site and soil properties on the DRIFT spectra of northern cold-region soils [Influence of site and soil properties on the mid-infrared spectra of northern cold-region soils]". United States. doi:10.1016/j.geoderma.2017.05.014.
@article{osti_1366531,
title = {Influence of site and soil properties on the DRIFT spectra of northern cold-region soils [Influence of site and soil properties on the mid-infrared spectra of northern cold-region soils]},
author = {Matamala, Roser and Calderon, Francisco J. and Jastrow, Julie D. and Fan, Zhaosheng and Hofmann, Scott M. and Michaelson, Gary J. and Mishra, Umakant and Ping, Chien -Lu},
abstractNote = {Here, we investigated the influence of site characteristics and soil properties on the chemical composition of organic matter in soils collected from a latitudinal transect across Alaska through analysis of diffuse reflectance Fourier transform mid infrared (MidIR) spectra of bulk soils. The study included 119 soil samples collected from 28 sites including tundra, boreal forest, and grassland ecosystems. Organic, mineral, and cryoturbated soil horizons, both seasonally and perennially frozen, from a variety of depths and edaphic conditions were examined. The amount and chemical composition of organic matter as well as site and soil properties exerted a strong influence on the MidIR spectra. The spectra were highly sensitive to the extent of organic matter decomposition, enabling the ordination of Oi, Oe and Oa organic horizons. Differences in absorbance intensity for several spectral bands indicated that Oi horizons contained greater abundance of relatively fresh residues, phenolic-OH compounds, aliphatic compounds (waxes, lipids and fats), and carbohydrates. In contrast, Oa horizons had a greater presence of amide groups (possibly from microbial residues), aromatics, C=C bonds, carboxylates and carboxylic acids. Another significant factor differentiating these horizons was the incorporation of clays and silicates into the decomposing organic matter of Oa horizons. Calculated height peak ratios showed a clear trend to greater decomposition among Oi, Oe and Oa. The MidIR spectra were related to many site/soil attributes including land cover type, parent material, and associated factors, such as permafrost presence/absence, soil drainage, horizon depth, bulk density, cation exchange capacity, and pH. Single MidIR spectral bands were identified that might be used in future studies to quickly estimate the organic and inorganic carbon, total nitrogen, and carbon:nitrogen ratios of soils from northern latitudes. Lastly, our results demonstrate that the information contained in MidIR spectra of bulk soil integrates the quantity and chemical composition of soil organic matter with soil forming factors and highlights the potential for using this information to assess the degradation state of organic matter stored in northern cold-region soils.},
doi = {10.1016/j.geoderma.2017.05.014},
journal = {Geoderma},
number = C,
volume = 305,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 05 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Jun 05 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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