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Title: Integrated structural biology and molecular ecology of N-cycling enzymes from ammonia-oxidizing archaea

Abstract

In this paper, knowledge of the molecular ecology and environmental determinants of ammonia-oxidizing organisms is critical to understanding and predicting the global nitrogen (N) and carbon cycles, but an incomplete biochemical picture hinders in vitro studies of N-cycling enzymes. Although an integrative structural and dynamic characterization at the atomic scale would advance our understanding of function tremendously, structural knowlede of key N-cycling enzymes from ecologically-relevant ammonia oxidizers is unfortunately extremely limited. Here, we discuss the challenges and opportunities for examining the ecology of ammonia-oxidizing organisms, particularly uncultivated Thaumarchaeota, though (meta)genome-driven structural biology of the enzymes ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) and nitrite reductase (NirK).

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [2];  [1]
  1. Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States)
  2. Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
  3. SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1366499
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Environmental Microbiology Reports
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Environmental Microbiology Reports; Journal ID: ISSN 1758-2229
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Tolar, Bradley B., Herrmann, Jonathan, Bargar, John R., van den Bedem, Henry, Wakatsuki, Soichi, and Francis, Christopher A. Integrated structural biology and molecular ecology of N-cycling enzymes from ammonia-oxidizing archaea. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1111/1758-2229.12567.
Tolar, Bradley B., Herrmann, Jonathan, Bargar, John R., van den Bedem, Henry, Wakatsuki, Soichi, & Francis, Christopher A. Integrated structural biology and molecular ecology of N-cycling enzymes from ammonia-oxidizing archaea. United States. doi:10.1111/1758-2229.12567.
Tolar, Bradley B., Herrmann, Jonathan, Bargar, John R., van den Bedem, Henry, Wakatsuki, Soichi, and Francis, Christopher A. 2017. "Integrated structural biology and molecular ecology of N-cycling enzymes from ammonia-oxidizing archaea". United States. doi:10.1111/1758-2229.12567.
@article{osti_1366499,
title = {Integrated structural biology and molecular ecology of N-cycling enzymes from ammonia-oxidizing archaea},
author = {Tolar, Bradley B. and Herrmann, Jonathan and Bargar, John R. and van den Bedem, Henry and Wakatsuki, Soichi and Francis, Christopher A.},
abstractNote = {In this paper, knowledge of the molecular ecology and environmental determinants of ammonia-oxidizing organisms is critical to understanding and predicting the global nitrogen (N) and carbon cycles, but an incomplete biochemical picture hinders in vitro studies of N-cycling enzymes. Although an integrative structural and dynamic characterization at the atomic scale would advance our understanding of function tremendously, structural knowlede of key N-cycling enzymes from ecologically-relevant ammonia oxidizers is unfortunately extremely limited. Here, we discuss the challenges and opportunities for examining the ecology of ammonia-oxidizing organisms, particularly uncultivated Thaumarchaeota, though (meta)genome-driven structural biology of the enzymes ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) and nitrite reductase (NirK).},
doi = {10.1111/1758-2229.12567},
journal = {Environmental Microbiology Reports},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 6
}

Journal Article:
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