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Title: Synthesis Study on Transitions in Signal Infrastructure and Control Algorithms for Connected and Automated Transportation

Abstract

Documenting existing state of practice is an initial step in developing future control infrastructure to be co-deployed for heterogeneous mix of connected and automated vehicles with human drivers while leveraging benefits to safety, congestion, and energy. With advances in information technology and extensive deployment of connected and automated vehicle technology anticipated over the coming decades, cities globally are making efforts to plan and prepare for these transitions. CAVs not only offer opportunities to improve transportation systems through enhanced safety and efficient operations of vehicles. There are also significant needs in terms of exploring how best to leverage vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) technology, vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) technology and vehicle-to-everything (V2X) technology. Both Connected Vehicle (CV) and Connected and Automated Vehicle (CAV) paradigms feature bi-directional connectivity and share similar applications in terms of signal control algorithm and infrastructure implementation. The discussion in our synthesis study assumes the CAV/CV context where connectivity exists with or without automated vehicles. Our synthesis study explores the current state of signal control algorithms and infrastructure, reports the completed and newly proposed CV/CAV deployment studies regarding signal control schemes, reviews the deployment costs for CAV/AV signal infrastructure, and concludes with a discussion on the opportunities such as detector free signal controlmore » schemes and dynamic performance management for intersections, and challenges such as dependency on market adaptation and the need to build a fault-tolerant signal system deployment in a CAV/CV environment. The study will serve as an initial critical assessment of existing signal control infrastructure (devices, control instruments, and firmware) and control schemes (actuated, adaptive, and coordinated-green wave). Also, the report will help to identify the future needs for the signal infrastructure to act as the nervous system for urban transportation networks, providing not only signaling, but also observability, surveillance, and measurement capacity. The discussion of the opportunities space includes network optimization and control theory perspectives, and the current states of observability for key system parameters (what can be detected, how frequently can it be reported) as well as controllability of dynamic parameters (this includes adjusting not only the signal phase and timing, but also the ability to alter vehicle trajectories through information or direct control). The perspective of observability and controllability of the dynamic systems provides an appropriate lens to discuss future directions as CAV/CV become more prevalent in the future.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [4]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  2. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
  3. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
  4. Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1366412
Report Number(s):
ORNL/TM-2017/280
VT1301000; CEVT340
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS

Citation Formats

Aziz, H. M. Abdul, Wang, Hong, Young, Stan, Sperling, Joshua, and Beck, John. Synthesis Study on Transitions in Signal Infrastructure and Control Algorithms for Connected and Automated Transportation. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1366412.
Aziz, H. M. Abdul, Wang, Hong, Young, Stan, Sperling, Joshua, & Beck, John. Synthesis Study on Transitions in Signal Infrastructure and Control Algorithms for Connected and Automated Transportation. United States. doi:10.2172/1366412.
Aziz, H. M. Abdul, Wang, Hong, Young, Stan, Sperling, Joshua, and Beck, John. Thu . "Synthesis Study on Transitions in Signal Infrastructure and Control Algorithms for Connected and Automated Transportation". United States. doi:10.2172/1366412. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1366412.
@article{osti_1366412,
title = {Synthesis Study on Transitions in Signal Infrastructure and Control Algorithms for Connected and Automated Transportation},
author = {Aziz, H. M. Abdul and Wang, Hong and Young, Stan and Sperling, Joshua and Beck, John},
abstractNote = {Documenting existing state of practice is an initial step in developing future control infrastructure to be co-deployed for heterogeneous mix of connected and automated vehicles with human drivers while leveraging benefits to safety, congestion, and energy. With advances in information technology and extensive deployment of connected and automated vehicle technology anticipated over the coming decades, cities globally are making efforts to plan and prepare for these transitions. CAVs not only offer opportunities to improve transportation systems through enhanced safety and efficient operations of vehicles. There are also significant needs in terms of exploring how best to leverage vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) technology, vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) technology and vehicle-to-everything (V2X) technology. Both Connected Vehicle (CV) and Connected and Automated Vehicle (CAV) paradigms feature bi-directional connectivity and share similar applications in terms of signal control algorithm and infrastructure implementation. The discussion in our synthesis study assumes the CAV/CV context where connectivity exists with or without automated vehicles. Our synthesis study explores the current state of signal control algorithms and infrastructure, reports the completed and newly proposed CV/CAV deployment studies regarding signal control schemes, reviews the deployment costs for CAV/AV signal infrastructure, and concludes with a discussion on the opportunities such as detector free signal control schemes and dynamic performance management for intersections, and challenges such as dependency on market adaptation and the need to build a fault-tolerant signal system deployment in a CAV/CV environment. The study will serve as an initial critical assessment of existing signal control infrastructure (devices, control instruments, and firmware) and control schemes (actuated, adaptive, and coordinated-green wave). Also, the report will help to identify the future needs for the signal infrastructure to act as the nervous system for urban transportation networks, providing not only signaling, but also observability, surveillance, and measurement capacity. The discussion of the opportunities space includes network optimization and control theory perspectives, and the current states of observability for key system parameters (what can be detected, how frequently can it be reported) as well as controllability of dynamic parameters (this includes adjusting not only the signal phase and timing, but also the ability to alter vehicle trajectories through information or direct control). The perspective of observability and controllability of the dynamic systems provides an appropriate lens to discuss future directions as CAV/CV become more prevalent in the future.},
doi = {10.2172/1366412},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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