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Title: Molecular-level simulations of turbulence and its decay

Abstract

Here, we provide the first demonstration that molecular-level methods based on gas kinetic theory and molecular chaos can simulate turbulence and its decay. The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, a molecular-level technique for simulating gas flows that resolves phenomena from molecular to hydrodynamic (continuum) length scales, is applied to simulate the Taylor-Green vortex flow. The DSMC simulations reproduce the Kolmogorov –5/3 law and agree well with the turbulent kinetic energy and energy dissipation rate obtained from direct numerical simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations using a spectral method. This agreement provides strong evidence that molecular-level methods for gases can be used to investigate turbulent flows quantitatively.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
  2. Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1365812
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1343352
Report Number(s):
SAND-2017-1611J
Journal ID: ISSN 0031-9007; PRLTAO; 654304
Grant/Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Physical Review Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 118; Journal Issue: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 0031-9007
Publisher:
American Physical Society (APS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS

Citation Formats

Gallis, M. A., Bitter, N. P., Koehler, T. P., Torczynski, J. R., Plimpton, S. J., and Papadakis, G.. Molecular-level simulations of turbulence and its decay. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.064501.
Gallis, M. A., Bitter, N. P., Koehler, T. P., Torczynski, J. R., Plimpton, S. J., & Papadakis, G.. Molecular-level simulations of turbulence and its decay. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.064501.
Gallis, M. A., Bitter, N. P., Koehler, T. P., Torczynski, J. R., Plimpton, S. J., and Papadakis, G.. Wed . "Molecular-level simulations of turbulence and its decay". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.064501. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1365812.
@article{osti_1365812,
title = {Molecular-level simulations of turbulence and its decay},
author = {Gallis, M. A. and Bitter, N. P. and Koehler, T. P. and Torczynski, J. R. and Plimpton, S. J. and Papadakis, G.},
abstractNote = {Here, we provide the first demonstration that molecular-level methods based on gas kinetic theory and molecular chaos can simulate turbulence and its decay. The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, a molecular-level technique for simulating gas flows that resolves phenomena from molecular to hydrodynamic (continuum) length scales, is applied to simulate the Taylor-Green vortex flow. The DSMC simulations reproduce the Kolmogorov –5/3 law and agree well with the turbulent kinetic energy and energy dissipation rate obtained from direct numerical simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations using a spectral method. This agreement provides strong evidence that molecular-level methods for gases can be used to investigate turbulent flows quantitatively.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.064501},
journal = {Physical Review Letters},
number = 6,
volume = 118,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 08 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Feb 08 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

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