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Title: Flywheel Energy Storage - Dynamic Modeling

Abstract

A flywheel energy storage systems (FESS) is suitable for high-power, low-energy content to deliver or absorb power in surges. This type of application is very suitable for frequency regulation in an electric grid. In addition, a modern FESS is built as a high-efficiency, high-speed motor/generator drive system that employs modern power electronics, therefore, the power quality of the grid-connected output is excellent. In addition, a FESS is very valuable to delivering ancillary services to the grid, and it can contribute reactive power compensation. Thus, a FESS can maintain high reliability in power systems by providing ride-through capability to the power system area while the rest of the generating fleet, which has a slower response in the power system, performs primary and secondary frequency response to the grid. A FESS has several advantages compared to a chemical-based energy storage (CBES) system, namely: it has high energy density and durability, and it can be cycled frequently without impacting performance. The response of FESS is faster than that of a CBES. Also, unlike some CBES, FESS has the same performance regardless of the number of cycles of charging/discharging performed throughout its lifetime.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind and Water Technologies Office (EE-4W)
OSTI Identifier:
1365690
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-5D00-68515
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at the 2017 Ninth Annual IEEE Green Technologies Conference (GreenTech), 29-31 March 2017, Denver, Colorado
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; flywheel energy storage systems; FESS; frequency regulation; electric grid; power electronics; ancillary services

Citation Formats

Muljadi, Eduard, and Gevorgian, Vahan. Flywheel Energy Storage - Dynamic Modeling. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1109/GreenTech.2017.52.
Muljadi, Eduard, & Gevorgian, Vahan. Flywheel Energy Storage - Dynamic Modeling. United States. doi:10.1109/GreenTech.2017.52.
Muljadi, Eduard, and Gevorgian, Vahan. Thu . "Flywheel Energy Storage - Dynamic Modeling". United States. doi:10.1109/GreenTech.2017.52.
@article{osti_1365690,
title = {Flywheel Energy Storage - Dynamic Modeling},
author = {Muljadi, Eduard and Gevorgian, Vahan},
abstractNote = {A flywheel energy storage systems (FESS) is suitable for high-power, low-energy content to deliver or absorb power in surges. This type of application is very suitable for frequency regulation in an electric grid. In addition, a modern FESS is built as a high-efficiency, high-speed motor/generator drive system that employs modern power electronics, therefore, the power quality of the grid-connected output is excellent. In addition, a FESS is very valuable to delivering ancillary services to the grid, and it can contribute reactive power compensation. Thus, a FESS can maintain high reliability in power systems by providing ride-through capability to the power system area while the rest of the generating fleet, which has a slower response in the power system, performs primary and secondary frequency response to the grid. A FESS has several advantages compared to a chemical-based energy storage (CBES) system, namely: it has high energy density and durability, and it can be cycled frequently without impacting performance. The response of FESS is faster than that of a CBES. Also, unlike some CBES, FESS has the same performance regardless of the number of cycles of charging/discharging performed throughout its lifetime.},
doi = {10.1109/GreenTech.2017.52},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu May 11 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu May 11 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Conference:
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