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Title: Chapter 4: Control

Abstract

The industry's primary goal for state-of-the-art wind turbine controllers is to maximise the energy capture while keeping the turbine within its operational limits, such as maximum rotor speed or maximum power, which is limited by the generator capacity. To guarantee a reliable operation over the turbine's lifetime, the structural loads need to be kept within their design limits. In the turbine and controller design process, an increase in energy is evaluated against higher loads; the result is that designers usually make specifications that increase material costs.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1365687
Report Number(s):
NREL/CH-5000-68731
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Book
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; wind turbines; energy capture; reliability; loads

Citation Formats

van Wingerden, J. W., Schlipf, D., and Gebraad, Pieter. Chapter 4: Control. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-46919-5_4.
van Wingerden, J. W., Schlipf, D., & Gebraad, Pieter. Chapter 4: Control. United States. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-46919-5_4.
van Wingerden, J. W., Schlipf, D., and Gebraad, Pieter. Thu . "Chapter 4: Control". United States. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-46919-5_4.
@article{osti_1365687,
title = {Chapter 4: Control},
author = {van Wingerden, J. W. and Schlipf, D. and Gebraad, Pieter},
abstractNote = {The industry's primary goal for state-of-the-art wind turbine controllers is to maximise the energy capture while keeping the turbine within its operational limits, such as maximum rotor speed or maximum power, which is limited by the generator capacity. To guarantee a reliable operation over the turbine's lifetime, the structural loads need to be kept within their design limits. In the turbine and controller design process, an increase in energy is evaluated against higher loads; the result is that designers usually make specifications that increase material costs.},
doi = {10.1007/978-3-319-46919-5_4},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Sep 22 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Thu Sep 22 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Book:
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