skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Effects of the Bering Strait closure on AMOC and global climate under different background climates

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1365596
Grant/Contract Number:
FC02-97ER62402
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Progress in Oceanography
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 132; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-06-23 15:56:47; Journal ID: ISSN 0079-6611
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Hu, Aixue, Meehl, Gerald A., Han, Weiqing, Otto-Bliestner, Bette, Abe-Ouchi, Ayako, and Rosenbloom, Nan. Effects of the Bering Strait closure on AMOC and global climate under different background climates. United Kingdom: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1016/j.pocean.2014.02.004.
Hu, Aixue, Meehl, Gerald A., Han, Weiqing, Otto-Bliestner, Bette, Abe-Ouchi, Ayako, & Rosenbloom, Nan. Effects of the Bering Strait closure on AMOC and global climate under different background climates. United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.pocean.2014.02.004.
Hu, Aixue, Meehl, Gerald A., Han, Weiqing, Otto-Bliestner, Bette, Abe-Ouchi, Ayako, and Rosenbloom, Nan. Sun . "Effects of the Bering Strait closure on AMOC and global climate under different background climates". United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.pocean.2014.02.004.
@article{osti_1365596,
title = {Effects of the Bering Strait closure on AMOC and global climate under different background climates},
author = {Hu, Aixue and Meehl, Gerald A. and Han, Weiqing and Otto-Bliestner, Bette and Abe-Ouchi, Ayako and Rosenbloom, Nan},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.pocean.2014.02.004},
journal = {Progress in Oceanography},
number = C,
volume = 132,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {Sun Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2015},
month = {Sun Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2015}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.pocean.2014.02.004

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 15works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

Save / Share:
  • Seawater nutrient, salinity, and oxygen 18 data collected from 1990 to 1993 in the Bering and Chukchi Seas were used to identify potential sources of nutrients and water masses that result in formation of the Arctic Ocean upper halocline and its associated nutrient maximum. Water matching the {delta}{sup 18}O values of the Arctic Ocean upper halocline and containing sufficient, or a nearly sufficient, nutrient and salinity concentration was collected in subsurface waters in the summer in portions of the Bering Sea, particularly the Gulf of Anadyr. However, nutrient concentrations significantly declined in this north flowing water over the shallow continentalmore » shelf before it reached the Bering Strait, as a consequence of biological utilization, and dilution with nutrient-poor and oxygen 18-depleted fresh water. Therefore it does not appear likely that the flow of unaltered water through the Bering Strait in the summer plays a critical role in the formation of the Arctic Ocean upper halocline. The role of other mechanisms for contributing Pacific-derived waters to the Arctic Ocean nutrient maximum is considered.{copyright} 1997 American Geophysical Union« less
  • The large-scale geographical patterns of the standard deviation of temperature in a global climate model for climates at the present level of CO[sub 2] and doubled CO[sub 2] levels were simulated, using data from groups of individual stations to assess the simulation of the diurnal range of temperature. It was found that the simulated patterns of interannual standard deviation of surface temperature agree with observations, except over the tropical oceans and in high latitudes in winter, where the respective model values were found to be smaller or larger, respectively, than observed. The changes on doubling CO[sub 2] were found tomore » be generally small and not statistically significant. However, there were reductions along the sea-ice margins in winter and increases in some regions of northern midlatitudes in summer. 45 refs.« less
  • The June-August 1992 (JJA 1992) season featured a weakening of the 1991-1992 El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) warm episode and a return toward normal conditions in the tropical Pacific. The sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTA) in the central and eastern equatorial Pacific decreased rapidly through the season. SSTA less than -1[degrees] were found in the eastern equatorial Pacific in August. The depth of the oceanic thermocline, which continued to decreased from April on, became shallower in the eastern Pacific (120[degrees]W-80[degrees]W) during the JJA season. The outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) index, Southern Oscillation index (SOI), and equatorial wind indices all indicate near-normalmore » oceanic and atmospheric circulations in the tropical Pacific. However, positive SSTA remained in the central Pacific Nino 4 area. In the Northern Hemisphere, below-normal temperatures dominated the landmass regions in midlatitudes except in Europe where above-normal temperatures persisted throughout the season. The unusual coolness during this season may have been related to the June 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines. The United States experienced its third coldest and third wettest summer in 77 years according to the National Climate Data Center (NCDC) climate records. The Indian monsoon season started in mid-June, which was later than usual, but overall it was a normal rainfall year, while the drought in the western Sahel continued. Tropical features are reviewed in section 2. The extratropics are discussed in section 3. The Indian summer monsoon and related circulation features are reviewed in section 4. 13 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab.« less
  • In this paper, the effects of irrigation on global surface water (SW) and groundwater (GW) resources are investigated by performing simulations using Community Land Model 4.0 (CLM4) at 0.5-degree resolution driven by downscaled/bias-corrected historical simulations and future projections from five General Circulation Models (GCMs) for 1950-2099. For each climate scenario, three sets of numerical experiments were configured: (1) a control experiment (CTRL) in which all crops are assumed to be rainfed; (2) an irrigation experiment (IRRIG) in which the irrigation module using only SW for irrigation is activated; and (3) a groundwater pumping experiment (PUMP) in which a groundwater pumpingmore » scheme coupled with the irrigation module is activated for conjunctive use of SW and GW for irrigation. The parameters associated with irrigation and groundwater pumping are calibrated based on a global inventory of census-based SW and GW use compiled by the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO). Our results suggest that irrigation could lead to two major opposing effects: SW depletion/GW accumulation in regions with irrigation primarily fed by SW, and SW accumulation/GW depletion in regions with irrigation fed primarily by GW. Furthermore, irrigation depending primarily on SW tends to have larger impacts on low-flow than high-flow conditions, suggesting the potential to increase vulnerability to drought. By the end of the 21st century (2070-2099), climate change significantly increases (relative to 1971-2000) irrigation water demand across the world. Combined with the increased temporal-spatial variability of water supply, this may lead to severe issues of local water scarcity for irrigation. Regionally, irrigation has the potential to aggravate/alleviate climate-induced changes of SW/GW although such effects are negligible when averaged globally. Our results emphasize the importance of accounting for irrigation effects and irrigation sources in regional climate change impact assessment.« less
    Cited by 21
  • In this paper, the effects of irrigation on global surface water (SW) and groundwater (GW) resources are investigated by performing simulations using Community Land Model 4.0 (CLM4) at 0.5-degree resolution driven by downscaled/bias-corrected historical simulations and future projections from five General Circulation Models (GCMs) for 1950-2099. For each climate scenario, three sets of numerical experiments were configured: (1) a control experiment (CTRL) in which all crops are assumed to be rainfed; (2) an irrigation experiment (IRRIG) in which the irrigation module using only SW for irrigation is activated; and (3) a groundwater pumping experiment (PUMP) in which a groundwater pumpingmore » scheme coupled with the irrigation module is activated for conjunctive use of SW and GW for irrigation. The parameters associated with irrigation and groundwater pumping are calibrated based on a global inventory of census-based SW and GW use compiled by the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO). Our results suggest that irrigation could lead to two major opposing effects: SW depletion/GW accumulation in regions with irrigation primarily fed by SW, and SW accumulation/GW depletion in regions with irrigation fed primarily by GW. Furthermore, irrigation depending primarily on SW tends to have larger impacts on low-flow than high-flow conditions, suggesting the potential to increase vulnerability to drought. By the end of the 21st century (2070-2099), climate change significantly increases (relative to 1971-2000) irrigation water demand across the world. Combined with the increased temporal-spatial variability of water supply, this may lead to severe issues of local water scarcity for irrigation. Regionally, irrigation has the potential to aggravate/alleviate climate-induced changes of SW/GW although such effects are negligible when averaged globally. Our results emphasize the importance of accounting for irrigation effects and irrigation sources in regional climate change impact assessment.« less