skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Systems Engineering Applied to the Development of a Wave Energy Farm.

Abstract

A motivation for undertaking this stakeholder requirements analysis and Systems Engineering exercise is to document the requirements for successful wave energy farms to facilitate better design and better design assessments. A difficulty in wave energy technology development is the absence to date of a verifiable minimum viable product against which the merits of new products might be measured. A consequence of this absence is that technology development progress, technology value, and technology funding have largely been measured, associated with, and driven by technology readiness, measured in technology readiness levels (TRLs). Originating primarily from the space and defense industries, TRLs focus on procedural implementation of technology developments of large and complex engineering projects, where cost is neither mission critical nor a key design driver. The key deficiency with the TRL approach in the context of wave energy conversion is that WEC technology development has been too focused on commercial readiness and not enough on the stakeholder requirements and particularly economic viability required for market entry.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [2];  [1];  [6];  [6]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
  2. Wave Venture Ltd., Cornwall (United Kingdom)
  3. Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Nantes (France)
  4. Ramboll, Copenhagen (Denmark)
  5. DNV GL, London (United Kingdom)
  6. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind and Water Technologies Office (EE-4W)
OSTI Identifier:
1365534
Report Number(s):
SAND2017-4507
652904
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
16 TIDAL AND WAVE POWER

Citation Formats

Roberts, Jesse D., Bull, Diana L., Costello, Ronan Patrick, Babarit, Aurelien, Nielsen, Kim, Ferreira, Claudio Bittencourt, Kennedy, Ben, Malins, Robert Joseph, Dykes, Kathryn, and Weber, Jochem. Systems Engineering Applied to the Development of a Wave Energy Farm.. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1365534.
Roberts, Jesse D., Bull, Diana L., Costello, Ronan Patrick, Babarit, Aurelien, Nielsen, Kim, Ferreira, Claudio Bittencourt, Kennedy, Ben, Malins, Robert Joseph, Dykes, Kathryn, & Weber, Jochem. Systems Engineering Applied to the Development of a Wave Energy Farm.. United States. doi:10.2172/1365534.
Roberts, Jesse D., Bull, Diana L., Costello, Ronan Patrick, Babarit, Aurelien, Nielsen, Kim, Ferreira, Claudio Bittencourt, Kennedy, Ben, Malins, Robert Joseph, Dykes, Kathryn, and Weber, Jochem. Sat . "Systems Engineering Applied to the Development of a Wave Energy Farm.". United States. doi:10.2172/1365534. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1365534.
@article{osti_1365534,
title = {Systems Engineering Applied to the Development of a Wave Energy Farm.},
author = {Roberts, Jesse D. and Bull, Diana L. and Costello, Ronan Patrick and Babarit, Aurelien and Nielsen, Kim and Ferreira, Claudio Bittencourt and Kennedy, Ben and Malins, Robert Joseph and Dykes, Kathryn and Weber, Jochem},
abstractNote = {A motivation for undertaking this stakeholder requirements analysis and Systems Engineering exercise is to document the requirements for successful wave energy farms to facilitate better design and better design assessments. A difficulty in wave energy technology development is the absence to date of a verifiable minimum viable product against which the merits of new products might be measured. A consequence of this absence is that technology development progress, technology value, and technology funding have largely been measured, associated with, and driven by technology readiness, measured in technology readiness levels (TRLs). Originating primarily from the space and defense industries, TRLs focus on procedural implementation of technology developments of large and complex engineering projects, where cost is neither mission critical nor a key design driver. The key deficiency with the TRL approach in the context of wave energy conversion is that WEC technology development has been too focused on commercial readiness and not enough on the stakeholder requirements and particularly economic viability required for market entry.},
doi = {10.2172/1365534},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share:
  • Abstract not provided.
  • This paper surveys the landscape of systems engineering methods and current wind modeling capabilities to assess the potential for development of a systems engineering to wind energy research, design, and development. Wind energy has evolved from a small industry in a few countries to a large international industry involving major organizations in the manufacturing, development, and utility sectors. Along with this growth, significant technology innovation has led to larger turbines with lower associated costs of energy and ever more complex designs for all major subsystems - from the rotor, hub, and tower to the drivetrain, electronics, and controls. However, asmore » large-scale deployment of the technology continues and its contribution to electricity generation becomes more prominent, so have the expectations of the technology in terms of performance and cost. For the industry to become a sustainable source of electricity, innovation in wind energy technology must continue to improve performance and lower the cost of energy while supporting seamless integration of wind generation into the electric grid without significant negative impacts on local communities and environments. At the same time, issues associated with wind energy research, design, and development are noticeably increasing in complexity. The industry would benefit from an integrated approach that simultaneously addresses turbine design, plant design and development, grid interaction and operation, and mitigation of adverse community and environmental impacts. These activities must be integrated in order to meet this diverse set of goals while recognizing trade-offs that exist between them. While potential exists today to integrate across different domains within the wind energy system design process, organizational barriers such as different institutional objectives and the importance of proprietary information have previously limited a system level approach to wind energy research, design, and development. To address these challenges, NREL has embarked on an initiative to evaluate how methods of systems engineering can be applied to the research, design and development of wind energy systems. Systems engineering is a field within engineering with a long history of research and application to complex technical systems in domains such as aerospace, automotive, and naval architecture. As such, the field holds potential for addressing critical issues that face the wind industry today. This paper represents a first step for understanding this potential through a review of systems engineering methods as applied to related technical systems. It illustrates how this might inform a Wind Energy Systems Engineering (WESE) approach to the research, design, and development needs for the future of the industry. Section 1 provides a brief overview of systems engineering and wind as a complex system. Section 2 describes these system engineering methods in detail. Section 3 provides an overview of different types of design tools for wind energy with emphasis on NREL tools. Finally, Section 4 provides an overview of the role and importance of software architecture and computing to the use of systems engineering methods and the future development of any WESE programs. Section 5 provides a roadmap of potential research integrating systems engineering research methodologies and wind energy design tools for a WESE framework.« less
  • The Systems Engineering Management Plan for Project W-314 has been prepared within the guidelines of HNF-SD-WM-SEMP-002, TWRS Systems Engineering Management Plan. The activities within this SEMP have been tailored, in accordance with the TWRS SEMP and DOE Order 430.1, Life Cycle Asset Management, to meet the needs of the project.
  • This plan describes the systems engineering process to develop and manage the technical baseline. It defines the documents, interfaces, and procedures used by the Tank Farm Contractor.