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Title: From data to knowledge: The future of multi-omics data analysis for the rhizosphere

Abstract

The rhizosphere is the interface between a plant's roots and its surrounding soil. The rhizosphere microbiome, a complex microbial ecosystem, nourishes the terrestrial biosphere. Integrated multi-omics is a modern approach to systems biology that analyzes and interprets the datasets of multiple -omes of both individual organisms and multi-organism communities and consortia. The successful usage and application of integrated multi-omics to rhizospheric science is predicated upon the availability of rhizosphere-specific data, metadata and software. This review analyzes the availability of multi-omics data, metadata and software for rhizospheric science, identifying potential issues, challenges and opportunities.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1365446
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-125262
Journal ID: ISSN 2452-2198; KP1704020
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Rhizosphere; Journal Volume: 3; Journal Issue: P2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
rhizosphere; multi-omics; metagenomics; metatranscriptomics; metaproteomics; metabolomics; next-generation sequencing; data integration

Citation Formats

Allen White, Richard, Borkum, Mark I., Rivas-Ubach, Albert, Bilbao, Aivett, Wendler, Jason P., Colby, Sean M., Köberl, Martina, and Jansson, Christer. From data to knowledge: The future of multi-omics data analysis for the rhizosphere. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.rhisph.2017.05.001.
Allen White, Richard, Borkum, Mark I., Rivas-Ubach, Albert, Bilbao, Aivett, Wendler, Jason P., Colby, Sean M., Köberl, Martina, & Jansson, Christer. From data to knowledge: The future of multi-omics data analysis for the rhizosphere. United States. doi:10.1016/j.rhisph.2017.05.001.
Allen White, Richard, Borkum, Mark I., Rivas-Ubach, Albert, Bilbao, Aivett, Wendler, Jason P., Colby, Sean M., Köberl, Martina, and Jansson, Christer. Thu . "From data to knowledge: The future of multi-omics data analysis for the rhizosphere". United States. doi:10.1016/j.rhisph.2017.05.001.
@article{osti_1365446,
title = {From data to knowledge: The future of multi-omics data analysis for the rhizosphere},
author = {Allen White, Richard and Borkum, Mark I. and Rivas-Ubach, Albert and Bilbao, Aivett and Wendler, Jason P. and Colby, Sean M. and Köberl, Martina and Jansson, Christer},
abstractNote = {The rhizosphere is the interface between a plant's roots and its surrounding soil. The rhizosphere microbiome, a complex microbial ecosystem, nourishes the terrestrial biosphere. Integrated multi-omics is a modern approach to systems biology that analyzes and interprets the datasets of multiple -omes of both individual organisms and multi-organism communities and consortia. The successful usage and application of integrated multi-omics to rhizospheric science is predicated upon the availability of rhizosphere-specific data, metadata and software. This review analyzes the availability of multi-omics data, metadata and software for rhizospheric science, identifying potential issues, challenges and opportunities.},
doi = {10.1016/j.rhisph.2017.05.001},
journal = {Rhizosphere},
number = P2,
volume = 3,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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