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Title: Thermal Tracker: The Secret Lives of Bats and Birds Revealed

Abstract

Offshore wind developers and stakeholders can accelerate the sustainable, widespread deployment of offshore wind using a new open-source software program, called ThermalTracker. Researchers can now collect the data they need to better understand the potential effects of offshore wind turbines on bird and bat populations. This plug and play software can be used with any standard desktop computer, thermal camera, and statistical software to identify species and behaviors of animals in offshore locations.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
PNNL (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1365388
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; OFFSHORE WIND; BATS AND BIRDS; THERMAL TRACKER; ANIMAL BEHAVIOR

Citation Formats

None. Thermal Tracker: The Secret Lives of Bats and Birds Revealed. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
None. Thermal Tracker: The Secret Lives of Bats and Birds Revealed. United States.
None. 2017. "Thermal Tracker: The Secret Lives of Bats and Birds Revealed". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1365388.
@article{osti_1365388,
title = {Thermal Tracker: The Secret Lives of Bats and Birds Revealed},
author = {None},
abstractNote = {Offshore wind developers and stakeholders can accelerate the sustainable, widespread deployment of offshore wind using a new open-source software program, called ThermalTracker. Researchers can now collect the data they need to better understand the potential effects of offshore wind turbines on bird and bat populations. This plug and play software can be used with any standard desktop computer, thermal camera, and statistical software to identify species and behaviors of animals in offshore locations.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 5
}
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