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Title: Radiolytic and thermal process relevant to dry storage of spent nuclear fuels. 1998 annual progress report

Abstract

'This project involves basic research in chemistry and physics aimed at providing information pertinent to the safe long-term dry storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF), thousands of tons of which remain in water storage across the DOE complex. The Hanford Site K-Basins alone hold 2,300 tons of spent fuel, much of it severely corroded, and similar situations exist at Savannah River and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The DOE plans to remove this fuel and seal it in overpack canisters for dry interim storage for up to 75 years while awaiting permanent disposition. Chemically-bound water will remain in this fuel even following proposed drying steps, leading to possible long-term corrosion of the containers and/or fuel rods themselves, generation of H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} gas via radiolysis (which could lead to deflagration or detonation), and reactions of pyrophoric uranium hydrides. No thoroughly tested model is currently available to predict fuel behavior during pre-processing, processing, or storage. In a collaboration between Rutgers University, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and Brookhaven National Laboratory, the authors are studying the radiolytic reaction, drying processes, and corrosion behavior of actual SNF materials, and of pure and mixed-phase samples. The authors propose to determine what ismore » omitted from current models: radiolysis of water adsorbed on or in hydrates or hydroxides, thermodynamics of interfacial phases, and kinetics of drying. A model will be developed and tested against actual fuel rod behavior to insure validity and applicability to the problems associated with developing dry storage strategies for DOE-owned SNF. This report summarizes work after eight months of a three-year project.'« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (US)
  2. Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (US)
  3. Rutgers, The State Univ. of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (US)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (US); Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Science and Risk Policy
OSTI Identifier:
13653
Report Number(s):
EMSP-60392-98
ON: DE00013653
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
40; 05; Progress Report; Catalysts; Chemical Reactions; Waste Processing; Solid Solutions; Spent Fuels; PROGRESS REPORT; CATALYSTS; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; WASTE PROCESSING; SOLID SOLUTIONS; SPENT FUELS

Citation Formats

Marschman, S C, Cowin, J P, Orlando, T M, Haustein, P E, and Madey, T E. Radiolytic and thermal process relevant to dry storage of spent nuclear fuels. 1998 annual progress report. United States: N. p., 1998. Web. doi:10.2172/13653.
Marschman, S C, Cowin, J P, Orlando, T M, Haustein, P E, & Madey, T E. Radiolytic and thermal process relevant to dry storage of spent nuclear fuels. 1998 annual progress report. United States. doi:10.2172/13653.
Marschman, S C, Cowin, J P, Orlando, T M, Haustein, P E, and Madey, T E. Mon . "Radiolytic and thermal process relevant to dry storage of spent nuclear fuels. 1998 annual progress report". United States. doi:10.2172/13653. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/13653.
@article{osti_13653,
title = {Radiolytic and thermal process relevant to dry storage of spent nuclear fuels. 1998 annual progress report},
author = {Marschman, S C and Cowin, J P and Orlando, T M and Haustein, P E and Madey, T E},
abstractNote = {'This project involves basic research in chemistry and physics aimed at providing information pertinent to the safe long-term dry storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF), thousands of tons of which remain in water storage across the DOE complex. The Hanford Site K-Basins alone hold 2,300 tons of spent fuel, much of it severely corroded, and similar situations exist at Savannah River and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The DOE plans to remove this fuel and seal it in overpack canisters for dry interim storage for up to 75 years while awaiting permanent disposition. Chemically-bound water will remain in this fuel even following proposed drying steps, leading to possible long-term corrosion of the containers and/or fuel rods themselves, generation of H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} gas via radiolysis (which could lead to deflagration or detonation), and reactions of pyrophoric uranium hydrides. No thoroughly tested model is currently available to predict fuel behavior during pre-processing, processing, or storage. In a collaboration between Rutgers University, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and Brookhaven National Laboratory, the authors are studying the radiolytic reaction, drying processes, and corrosion behavior of actual SNF materials, and of pure and mixed-phase samples. The authors propose to determine what is omitted from current models: radiolysis of water adsorbed on or in hydrates or hydroxides, thermodynamics of interfacial phases, and kinetics of drying. A model will be developed and tested against actual fuel rod behavior to insure validity and applicability to the problems associated with developing dry storage strategies for DOE-owned SNF. This report summarizes work after eight months of a three-year project.'},
doi = {10.2172/13653},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1998},
month = {6}
}