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Title: Geologic Map of the Organ Mountains and Southern San Andres Mountain Range, NM

Abstract

This is a digitized geologic map, in shapefile format, including rock unit lithological descriptions, faults, and dikes.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
DOE Geothermal Data Repository; Energy and Geoscience Institute at the University of Utah
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Geothermal Technologies Program (EE-2C)
OSTI Identifier:
1364773
Report Number(s):
934
DOE Contract Number:
EE0006730
Resource Type:
Data
Data Type:
Specialized Mix
Country of Publication:
United States
Availability:
GDRHelp@ee.doe.gov
Language:
English
Subject:
15 Geothermal Energy; geology; new mexico; map; faults; san andres; organ mountains; dikes; lithology; geologic layer; geologic map; stratigraphy; shape file; shapefile; ArcGIS; GIS; geospatial

Citation Formats

Nash, Greg, and Seager, William. Geologic Map of the Organ Mountains and Southern San Andres Mountain Range, NM. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.15121/1364773.
Nash, Greg, & Seager, William. Geologic Map of the Organ Mountains and Southern San Andres Mountain Range, NM. United States. doi:10.15121/1364773.
Nash, Greg, and Seager, William. Fri . "Geologic Map of the Organ Mountains and Southern San Andres Mountain Range, NM". United States. doi:10.15121/1364773. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1364773.
@article{osti_1364773,
title = {Geologic Map of the Organ Mountains and Southern San Andres Mountain Range, NM},
author = {Nash, Greg and Seager, William},
abstractNote = {This is a digitized geologic map, in shapefile format, including rock unit lithological descriptions, faults, and dikes.},
doi = {10.15121/1364773},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jun 16 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri Jun 16 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Dataset:

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  • The Rio Bonito Member of the San Andres Formation records a transgression of the northwestern shelf during the late Leonardian. Late Leonardian to Guadalupian marine carbonates exposed in the Sacramento Mountains relate a marked change from equatorial tidal flat rocks of the middle Leonardian Yeso Formation. These rocks were deposited during a worldwide sea level lowstand. The Yeso-San Andres contact, previously thought to be a gradational boundary, is here interpreted as a flooding surface resulting from the eustatic sea level rise after the lowstand. Inundation of the northwestern shelf led to deposition of the thick Andres Formation marine limestone sequencemore » within a shallow-lagoon or shelf setting. Depositional environments are predominantly subtidal and intertidal. Microfacies include packstones of comminuted bioclasts of normal saline affinities redistributed by light currents. These shoal upward at times to Dasycladacean algal grainstones interpreted as tidal bars prograding across the lagoon or shelf. More restricted wackestones and laminated mudstones occur at the base of the section and indicate a transition from tidal flat to submerged shelf. Aggradation of sediment into the intertidal zone may have occurred cyclically during San Andres deposition. One such cycle is present over the interval exposed in the Sacramento Mountains. Intertidal rocks resemble tidal flat deposits of dolostone, carbonate mudstones, and a thin tongue of quartzarenite interpeted to be Glorieta Sandstone. These rocks were previously attributed to interginguing of the Yeso with the San Andres.« less
  • The Mine Mountain area is a small range of hills on the west side of the central Yucca Flat basin on the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This map portrays the very complex relationships among the pre-Tertiary stratigraphic units of the region. Rocks and structures of the Mine Mountain area record the compounded effects of: (1) eastward-directed, foreland-vergent thrusting; (2) younger folds and thrusts formed by hinterland vergence in a general westerly direction; and (3) low-angle normal faulting formed by extension along a northeast-southwest trend. All of these structures are older than the oldest middle Miocene volcanic rocks thatmore » were deposited on the flanks of the Mine Mountain terrane. High-angle faults that post-date these volcanic rocks locally show displacements of several hundred meters, but do not strongly affect patterns in the pre-Tertiary rocks.« less