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Title: Importance of turbulence-chemistry interactions at low temperature engine conditions

Abstract

The role of turbulence-chemistry interaction in autoignition and flame stabilization is investigated for spray flames at low temperature combustion (LTC) conditions by performing high-fidelity three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. A recently developed Tabulated Flamelet Model (TFM) is coupled with a large eddy simulation (LES) framework and validated across a range of Engine Combustion Network (ECN) ambient temperature conditions for n-dodecane fuel. High resolution grids with 0.0625 mm minimum cell size and 25 million total cell count are implemented using adaptive mesh refinement over the spray and combustion regions. Simulations with these grids and multiple LES realizations, with a 103 species n-dodecane mechanism show good agreement with experimental data for all the ambient conditions investigated. This modeling approach with the computational cost advantage of tabulated chemistry is then extended towards understanding the auto-ignition and flame stabilization at an ambient temperature of 750 K. These low temperature conditions lead to substantially higher ignition delays and flame liftoff lengths, and significantly leaner combustion compared to conventional high temperature diesel combustion. These conditions also require the simulations to span significantly larger temporal and spatial dimensions thereby increasing the computational cost. The TFM approach is able to capture autoignition and flame liftoff length atmore » the low temperature conditions. Significant differences with respect to mixing, species formation and flame stabilization are observed under low temperature compared to conventional diesel combustion. At higher ambient temperatures, formation of formaldehyde is observed in the rich region (phi > 1) followed by the formation of OH in the stoichiometric regions. Under low temperature conditions, formaldehyde is observed to form at leaner regions followed by the onset of OH formation in significantly lean regions of the flame. Qualitative differences between species formation and transient flame development for the high and low temperature conditions are presented. The two stage ignition process is further investigated by studying the species formation in mixture fraction space by solving 1D flamelet equations for different scalar dissipation rates and homogeneous reactor assumption. Results show that scalar dissipation causes these radicals to diffuse within the mixture fraction space. As a result, this significantly enhances ignition and plays a dominant role at such low temperature conditions which cannot be captured by the homogeneous reaction assumption based model.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Lemont, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (EE-3V)
OSTI Identifier:
1364625
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Combustion and Flame
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 183; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0010-2180
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; low temperature combustion; ECN spray A; flamelets; LES

Citation Formats

Kundu, Prithwish, Ameen, Muhsin M., and Som, Sibendu. Importance of turbulence-chemistry interactions at low temperature engine conditions. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.combustflame.2017.05.025.
Kundu, Prithwish, Ameen, Muhsin M., & Som, Sibendu. Importance of turbulence-chemistry interactions at low temperature engine conditions. United States. doi:10.1016/j.combustflame.2017.05.025.
Kundu, Prithwish, Ameen, Muhsin M., and Som, Sibendu. Thu . "Importance of turbulence-chemistry interactions at low temperature engine conditions". United States. doi:10.1016/j.combustflame.2017.05.025.
@article{osti_1364625,
title = {Importance of turbulence-chemistry interactions at low temperature engine conditions},
author = {Kundu, Prithwish and Ameen, Muhsin M. and Som, Sibendu},
abstractNote = {The role of turbulence-chemistry interaction in autoignition and flame stabilization is investigated for spray flames at low temperature combustion (LTC) conditions by performing high-fidelity three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. A recently developed Tabulated Flamelet Model (TFM) is coupled with a large eddy simulation (LES) framework and validated across a range of Engine Combustion Network (ECN) ambient temperature conditions for n-dodecane fuel. High resolution grids with 0.0625 mm minimum cell size and 25 million total cell count are implemented using adaptive mesh refinement over the spray and combustion regions. Simulations with these grids and multiple LES realizations, with a 103 species n-dodecane mechanism show good agreement with experimental data for all the ambient conditions investigated. This modeling approach with the computational cost advantage of tabulated chemistry is then extended towards understanding the auto-ignition and flame stabilization at an ambient temperature of 750 K. These low temperature conditions lead to substantially higher ignition delays and flame liftoff lengths, and significantly leaner combustion compared to conventional high temperature diesel combustion. These conditions also require the simulations to span significantly larger temporal and spatial dimensions thereby increasing the computational cost. The TFM approach is able to capture autoignition and flame liftoff length at the low temperature conditions. Significant differences with respect to mixing, species formation and flame stabilization are observed under low temperature compared to conventional diesel combustion. At higher ambient temperatures, formation of formaldehyde is observed in the rich region (phi > 1) followed by the formation of OH in the stoichiometric regions. Under low temperature conditions, formaldehyde is observed to form at leaner regions followed by the onset of OH formation in significantly lean regions of the flame. Qualitative differences between species formation and transient flame development for the high and low temperature conditions are presented. The two stage ignition process is further investigated by studying the species formation in mixture fraction space by solving 1D flamelet equations for different scalar dissipation rates and homogeneous reactor assumption. Results show that scalar dissipation causes these radicals to diffuse within the mixture fraction space. As a result, this significantly enhances ignition and plays a dominant role at such low temperature conditions which cannot be captured by the homogeneous reaction assumption based model.},
doi = {10.1016/j.combustflame.2017.05.025},
journal = {Combustion and Flame},
number = C,
volume = 183,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jun 08 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Jun 08 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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  • Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine technology promises to reduce NO{sub x} and soot emissions while achieving high thermal efficiency. Temperature and mixture stratification are regarded as effective means of controlling the start of combustion and reducing the abrupt pressure rise at high loads. Probability density function methods are currently being pursued as a viable approach to modeling the effects of turbulent mixing and mixture stratification on HCCI ignition. In this paper we present an assessment of the merits of three widely used mixing models in reproducing the moments of reactive scalars during the ignition of a lean hydrogen/air mixturemore » ({phi}=0.1, p=41atm, and T=1070 K) under increasing temperature stratification and subject to decaying turbulence. The results from the solution of the evolution equation for a spatially homogeneous joint PDF of the reactive scalars are compared with available direct numerical simulation (DNS) data [E.R. Hawkes, R. Sankaran, P.P. Pebay, J.H. Chen, Combust. Flame 145 (1-2) (2006) 145-159]. The mixing models are found able to quantitatively reproduce the time history of the heat release rate, first and second moments of temperature, and hydroxyl radical mass fraction from the DNS results. Most importantly, the dependence of the heat release rate on the extent of the initial temperature stratification in the charge is also well captured. (author)« less
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  • A skeletal mechanism with 54 species and 269 reactions was developed to predict pyrolysis and oxidation of n-dodecane as a diesel fuel surrogate involving both high-temperature (high-T) and low-temperature (low-T) conditions. The skeletal mechanism was developed from a semi-detailed mechanism developed at the University of Southern California (USC). Species and reactions for high-T pyrolysis and oxidation of C5-C12 were reduced by using reaction flow analysis (RFA), isomer lumping, and then merged into a skeletal C0-C4 core to form a high-T sub-mechanism. Species and lumped semi-global reactions for low-T chemistry were then added to the high-T sub-mechanism and a 54-species skeletalmore » mechanism is obtained. The rate parameters of the low-T reactions were tuned against a detailed mechanism by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), as well as the Spray A flame experimental data, to improve the prediction of ignition delay at low-T conditions, while the high-T chemistry remained unchanged. The skeletal mechanism was validated for auto-ignition, perfectly stirred reactors (PSR), flow reactors and laminar premixed flames over a wide range of flame conditions. The skeletal mechanism was then employed to simulate three-dimensional turbulent spray flames at compression ignition engine conditions and validated against experimental data from the Engine Combustion Network (ECN).« less