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Title: Automating High-Precision X-Ray and Neutron Imaging Applications with Robotics

Abstract

Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of Texas at Austin recently implemented a robotically controlled nondestructive testing (NDT) system for X-ray and neutron imaging. This system is intended to address the need for accurate measurements for a variety of parts and, be able to track measurement geometry at every imaging location, and is designed for high-throughput applications. This system was deployed in a beam port at a nuclear research reactor and in an operational inspection X-ray bay. The nuclear research reactor system consisted of a precision industrial seven-axis robot, 1.1-MW TRIGA research reactor, and a scintillator-mirror-camera-based imaging system. The X-ray bay system incorporated the same robot, a 225-keV microfocus X-ray source, and a custom flat panel digital detector. The robotic positioning arm is programmable and allows imaging in multiple configurations, including planar, cylindrical, as well as other user defined geometries that provide enhanced engineering evaluation capability. The imaging acquisition device is coupled with the robot for automated image acquisition. The robot can achieve target positional repeatability within 17 μm in the 3-D space. Flexible automation with nondestructive imaging saves costs, reduces dosage, adds imaging techniques, and achieves better quality results in less time. Specifics regarding the robotic system andmore » imaging acquisition and evaluation processes are presented. In conclusion, this paper reviews the comprehensive testing and system evaluation to affirm the feasibility of robotic NDT, presents the system configuration, and reviews results for both X-ray and neutron radiography imaging applications.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  2. Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Nuclear and Radiation Teaching Lab., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1364540
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-24156
Journal ID: ISSN 1545-5955
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
IEEE Transactions on Automation Science and Engineering
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 15; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 1545-5955
Publisher:
IEEE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; autonomous system; calibration; collision avoidance; computed tomography (CT); flexible automation; helical scanning; motion control; nondestructive testing (NDT); path planning; precision movement; radiation damage; radiography; software communication

Citation Formats

Hashem, Joseph Anthony, Pryor, Mitch, Landsberger, Sheldon, Hunter, James F., and Janecky, David Richard. Automating High-Precision X-Ray and Neutron Imaging Applications with Robotics. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1109/TASE.2017.2675709.
Hashem, Joseph Anthony, Pryor, Mitch, Landsberger, Sheldon, Hunter, James F., & Janecky, David Richard. Automating High-Precision X-Ray and Neutron Imaging Applications with Robotics. United States. doi:10.1109/TASE.2017.2675709.
Hashem, Joseph Anthony, Pryor, Mitch, Landsberger, Sheldon, Hunter, James F., and Janecky, David Richard. Tue . "Automating High-Precision X-Ray and Neutron Imaging Applications with Robotics". United States. doi:10.1109/TASE.2017.2675709. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1364540.
@article{osti_1364540,
title = {Automating High-Precision X-Ray and Neutron Imaging Applications with Robotics},
author = {Hashem, Joseph Anthony and Pryor, Mitch and Landsberger, Sheldon and Hunter, James F. and Janecky, David Richard},
abstractNote = {Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of Texas at Austin recently implemented a robotically controlled nondestructive testing (NDT) system for X-ray and neutron imaging. This system is intended to address the need for accurate measurements for a variety of parts and, be able to track measurement geometry at every imaging location, and is designed for high-throughput applications. This system was deployed in a beam port at a nuclear research reactor and in an operational inspection X-ray bay. The nuclear research reactor system consisted of a precision industrial seven-axis robot, 1.1-MW TRIGA research reactor, and a scintillator-mirror-camera-based imaging system. The X-ray bay system incorporated the same robot, a 225-keV microfocus X-ray source, and a custom flat panel digital detector. The robotic positioning arm is programmable and allows imaging in multiple configurations, including planar, cylindrical, as well as other user defined geometries that provide enhanced engineering evaluation capability. The imaging acquisition device is coupled with the robot for automated image acquisition. The robot can achieve target positional repeatability within 17 μm in the 3-D space. Flexible automation with nondestructive imaging saves costs, reduces dosage, adds imaging techniques, and achieves better quality results in less time. Specifics regarding the robotic system and imaging acquisition and evaluation processes are presented. In conclusion, this paper reviews the comprehensive testing and system evaluation to affirm the feasibility of robotic NDT, presents the system configuration, and reviews results for both X-ray and neutron radiography imaging applications.},
doi = {10.1109/TASE.2017.2675709},
journal = {IEEE Transactions on Automation Science and Engineering},
number = 2,
volume = 15,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Mar 28 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Mar 28 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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