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Title: ASSERT FY16 Analysis of Feedstock Companion Markets

Abstract

Meeting Co-Optima biofuel production targets will require large quantities of mobilized biomass feedstock. Mobilization is of key importance as there is an abundance of biomass resources, yet little is available for purchase, let alone at desired quantity and quality levels needed for a continuous operation, e.g., a biorefinery. Therefore Co-Optima research includes outlining a path towards feedstock production at scale by understanding routes to mobilizing large quantities of biomass feedstock. Continuing along the vertically-integrated path that pioneer cellulosic biorefineries have taken will constrain the bioenergy industry to high biomass yield areas, limiting its ability to reach biofuel production at scale. To advance the cellulosic biofuels industry, a separation between feedstock supply and conversion is necessary. Thus, in contrast to the vertically integrated supply chain, two industries are required: a feedstock industry and a conversion industry. The split is beneficial for growers and feedstock processers as they are able to sell into multiple markets. That is, depots that produce value-add feedstock intermediates that are fully fungible in both the biofuels refining and other, so-called companion markets. As the biofuel industry is currently too small to leverage significant investment in up-stream infrastructure build-up, it requires an established (companion) market to secure demand,more » which de-risks potential investments and makes a build-up of processing and other logistics infrastructure more likely. A common concern to this theory however is that more demand by other markets could present a disadvantage for biofuels production as resource competition may increase prices leading to reduced availability of low-cost feedstock for biorefineries. To analyze the dynamics across multiple markets vying for the same resources, particularly the potential effects on resource price and distribution, the Companion Market Model (CMM) has been developed in this task by experts in feedstock supply chain analysis, market economics, and System Dynamics from the Idaho National Laboratory and MindsEye Computing.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1364508
Report Number(s):
INL/EXT-16-40083
TRN: US1703346
DOE Contract Number:
AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; BIOFUELS; BIOMASS; REFINING; MARKET; Biofuel; Co-Optima; Feedstock; Mobilization

Citation Formats

Lamers, Patrick, Hansen, Jason, Jacobson, Jacob J., Nguyen, Thuy, Nair, Shyam, Searcy, Erin, and Hess, J. Richard. ASSERT FY16 Analysis of Feedstock Companion Markets. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1364508.
Lamers, Patrick, Hansen, Jason, Jacobson, Jacob J., Nguyen, Thuy, Nair, Shyam, Searcy, Erin, & Hess, J. Richard. ASSERT FY16 Analysis of Feedstock Companion Markets. United States. doi:10.2172/1364508.
Lamers, Patrick, Hansen, Jason, Jacobson, Jacob J., Nguyen, Thuy, Nair, Shyam, Searcy, Erin, and Hess, J. Richard. 2016. "ASSERT FY16 Analysis of Feedstock Companion Markets". United States. doi:10.2172/1364508. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1364508.
@article{osti_1364508,
title = {ASSERT FY16 Analysis of Feedstock Companion Markets},
author = {Lamers, Patrick and Hansen, Jason and Jacobson, Jacob J. and Nguyen, Thuy and Nair, Shyam and Searcy, Erin and Hess, J. Richard},
abstractNote = {Meeting Co-Optima biofuel production targets will require large quantities of mobilized biomass feedstock. Mobilization is of key importance as there is an abundance of biomass resources, yet little is available for purchase, let alone at desired quantity and quality levels needed for a continuous operation, e.g., a biorefinery. Therefore Co-Optima research includes outlining a path towards feedstock production at scale by understanding routes to mobilizing large quantities of biomass feedstock. Continuing along the vertically-integrated path that pioneer cellulosic biorefineries have taken will constrain the bioenergy industry to high biomass yield areas, limiting its ability to reach biofuel production at scale. To advance the cellulosic biofuels industry, a separation between feedstock supply and conversion is necessary. Thus, in contrast to the vertically integrated supply chain, two industries are required: a feedstock industry and a conversion industry. The split is beneficial for growers and feedstock processers as they are able to sell into multiple markets. That is, depots that produce value-add feedstock intermediates that are fully fungible in both the biofuels refining and other, so-called companion markets. As the biofuel industry is currently too small to leverage significant investment in up-stream infrastructure build-up, it requires an established (companion) market to secure demand, which de-risks potential investments and makes a build-up of processing and other logistics infrastructure more likely. A common concern to this theory however is that more demand by other markets could present a disadvantage for biofuels production as resource competition may increase prices leading to reduced availability of low-cost feedstock for biorefineries. To analyze the dynamics across multiple markets vying for the same resources, particularly the potential effects on resource price and distribution, the Companion Market Model (CMM) has been developed in this task by experts in feedstock supply chain analysis, market economics, and System Dynamics from the Idaho National Laboratory and MindsEye Computing.},
doi = {10.2172/1364508},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

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