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Title: MARMOT update for oxide fuel modeling

Abstract

This report summarizes the lower-length-scale research and development progresses in FY16 at Idaho National Laboratory in developing mechanistic materials models for oxide fuels, in parallel to the development of the MARMOT code which will be summarized in a separate report. This effort is a critical component of the microstructure based fuel performance modeling approach, supported by the Fuels Product Line in the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program. The progresses can be classified into three categories: 1) development of materials models to be used in engineering scale fuel performance modeling regarding the effect of lattice defects on thermal conductivity, 2) development of modeling capabilities for mesoscale fuel behaviors including stage-3 gas release, grain growth, high burn-up structure, fracture and creep, and 3) improved understanding in material science by calculating the anisotropic grain boundary energies in UO$$_2$$ and obtaining thermodynamic data for solid fission products. Many of these topics are still under active development. They are updated in the report with proper amount of details. For some topics, separate reports are generated in parallel and so stated in the text. The accomplishments have led to better understanding of fuel behaviors and enhance capability of the MOOSE-BISON-MARMOT toolkit.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
  2. Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States)
  3. Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)
  4. Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
1364504
Report Number(s):
INL/EXT-16-40039
TRN: US1703362
DOE Contract Number:
AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; GRAIN BOUNDARIES; FISSION PRODUCTS; OXIDES; FUELS; SIMULATION; THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY; CRYSTAL DEFECTS; NUCLEAR ENERGY; MARMOT; modeling and simulation; oxide fuel

Citation Formats

Zhang, Yongfeng, Schwen, Daniel, Chakraborty, Pritam, Jiang, Chao, Aagesen, Larry, Ahmed, Karim, Jiang, Wen, Biner, Bulent, Bai, Xianming, Tonks, Michael, and Millett, Paul. MARMOT update for oxide fuel modeling. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1364504.
Zhang, Yongfeng, Schwen, Daniel, Chakraborty, Pritam, Jiang, Chao, Aagesen, Larry, Ahmed, Karim, Jiang, Wen, Biner, Bulent, Bai, Xianming, Tonks, Michael, & Millett, Paul. MARMOT update for oxide fuel modeling. United States. doi:10.2172/1364504.
Zhang, Yongfeng, Schwen, Daniel, Chakraborty, Pritam, Jiang, Chao, Aagesen, Larry, Ahmed, Karim, Jiang, Wen, Biner, Bulent, Bai, Xianming, Tonks, Michael, and Millett, Paul. 2016. "MARMOT update for oxide fuel modeling". United States. doi:10.2172/1364504. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1364504.
@article{osti_1364504,
title = {MARMOT update for oxide fuel modeling},
author = {Zhang, Yongfeng and Schwen, Daniel and Chakraborty, Pritam and Jiang, Chao and Aagesen, Larry and Ahmed, Karim and Jiang, Wen and Biner, Bulent and Bai, Xianming and Tonks, Michael and Millett, Paul},
abstractNote = {This report summarizes the lower-length-scale research and development progresses in FY16 at Idaho National Laboratory in developing mechanistic materials models for oxide fuels, in parallel to the development of the MARMOT code which will be summarized in a separate report. This effort is a critical component of the microstructure based fuel performance modeling approach, supported by the Fuels Product Line in the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program. The progresses can be classified into three categories: 1) development of materials models to be used in engineering scale fuel performance modeling regarding the effect of lattice defects on thermal conductivity, 2) development of modeling capabilities for mesoscale fuel behaviors including stage-3 gas release, grain growth, high burn-up structure, fracture and creep, and 3) improved understanding in material science by calculating the anisotropic grain boundary energies in UO$_2$ and obtaining thermodynamic data for solid fission products. Many of these topics are still under active development. They are updated in the report with proper amount of details. For some topics, separate reports are generated in parallel and so stated in the text. The accomplishments have led to better understanding of fuel behaviors and enhance capability of the MOOSE-BISON-MARMOT toolkit.},
doi = {10.2172/1364504},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Technical Report:

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  • BISON and MARMOT are two codes under development at the Idaho National Laboratory for engineering scale and lower length scale fuel performance modeling. It is desired to add capabilities for fast reactor applications to these codes. The fast reactor fuel types under consideration are metal (U-Pu-Zr) and oxide (MOX). The cladding types of interest include 316SS, D9, and HT9. The purpose of this report is to outline the proposed plans for code development and provide an overview of the models added to the BISON and MARMOT codes for fast reactor fuel behavior. A brief overview of preliminary discussions on themore » formation of a bilateral agreement between the Idaho National Laboratory and the National Nuclear Laboratory in the United Kingdom is presented.« less
  • MARMOT is the mesoscale fuel performance code under development as part of the US DOE Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Program. In this report, we provide a high level summary of MARMOT, its capabilities, and its current state of validation. The purpose of MARMOT is to predict the coevolution of microstructure and material properties of nuclear fuel and cladding. It accomplished this using the phase field method coupled to solid mechanics and heat conduction. MARMOT is based on the Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE), and much of its basic capability in the areas of the phase field method, mechanics,more » and heat conduction come directly from MOOSE modules. However, additional capability specific to fuel and cladding is available in MARMOT. While some validation of MARMOT has been completed in the areas of fission gas behavior and grain growth, much more validation needs to be conducted. However, new mesoscale data needs to be obtained in order to complete this validation.« less
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