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Title: Flooding Fragility Experiments and Prediction

Abstract

This report describes the work that has been performed on flooding fragility, both the experimental tests being carried out and the probabilistic fragility predictive models being produced in order to use the text results. Flooding experiments involving full-scale doors have commenced in the Portal Evaluation Tank. The goal of these experiments is to develop a full-scale component flooding experiment protocol and to acquire data that can be used to create Bayesian regression models representing the fragility of these components. This work is in support of the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway external hazards evaluation research and development.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
1364499
Report Number(s):
INL/EXT-16-39963
TRN: US1703358
DOE Contract Number:
AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; SAFETY MARGINS; PROBABILISTIC ESTIMATION; HAZARDS; FLOODS; flooding; fragility

Citation Formats

Smith, Curtis L., Tahhan, Antonio, Muchmore, Cody, Nichols, Larinda, Bhandari, Bishwo, and Pope, Chad. Flooding Fragility Experiments and Prediction. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1364499.
Smith, Curtis L., Tahhan, Antonio, Muchmore, Cody, Nichols, Larinda, Bhandari, Bishwo, & Pope, Chad. Flooding Fragility Experiments and Prediction. United States. doi:10.2172/1364499.
Smith, Curtis L., Tahhan, Antonio, Muchmore, Cody, Nichols, Larinda, Bhandari, Bishwo, and Pope, Chad. 2016. "Flooding Fragility Experiments and Prediction". United States. doi:10.2172/1364499. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1364499.
@article{osti_1364499,
title = {Flooding Fragility Experiments and Prediction},
author = {Smith, Curtis L. and Tahhan, Antonio and Muchmore, Cody and Nichols, Larinda and Bhandari, Bishwo and Pope, Chad},
abstractNote = {This report describes the work that has been performed on flooding fragility, both the experimental tests being carried out and the probabilistic fragility predictive models being produced in order to use the text results. Flooding experiments involving full-scale doors have commenced in the Portal Evaluation Tank. The goal of these experiments is to develop a full-scale component flooding experiment protocol and to acquire data that can be used to create Bayesian regression models representing the fragility of these components. This work is in support of the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway external hazards evaluation research and development.},
doi = {10.2172/1364499},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Technical Report:

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