skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Uncollided Flux Techniques for Discrete-Ordinate Radiation Transport Solutions in Rattlesnake

Abstract

One of the only real-time-resolved measurement tools used at the Transient Test Reactor (TREAT) is the fast-neutron hodoscope. The hodoscope was used for monitoring and measuring fuel motion during a transient pulse. The hodoscope is a line of sight detection and imaging system that provides both temporal and spatial resolution of fuel motion during transients, and in-place measurement of fuel distribution during and after transient experiments. However, the hodoscope relies on fast neutron streaming out of the reactor core, which provides a challenge to transient modeling and simulation. However, use of a first collision source approach can be used to overcome this shortcoming. Hence, the TREAT modeling and simulation team has initiated research to implement such capabilities in the neutron transport code Rattlesnake. This report reviews uncollided flux techniques (first and last collision methods) to be implemented in the Rattlesnake SN code in order to mitigate ray effects in modeling the TREAT reactor+hodoscope system. Angular discretization techniques (SN and PN) for the transport equation are notoriously poor at capturing effectively streaming effects.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)
  2. Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
1364492
Report Number(s):
INL/EXT-16-39796
TRN: US1702268
DOE Contract Number:  
AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; FAST NEUTRONS; NEUTRON TRANSPORT; DISCRETE ORDINATE METHOD; TEST REACTORS; HODOSCOPES; first collision; last collision; streaming; transport; TREAT; uncollided

Citation Formats

Ragusa, Jean C., and DeHart, Mark D. Uncollided Flux Techniques for Discrete-Ordinate Radiation Transport Solutions in Rattlesnake. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1364492.
Ragusa, Jean C., & DeHart, Mark D. Uncollided Flux Techniques for Discrete-Ordinate Radiation Transport Solutions in Rattlesnake. United States. doi:10.2172/1364492.
Ragusa, Jean C., and DeHart, Mark D. Mon . "Uncollided Flux Techniques for Discrete-Ordinate Radiation Transport Solutions in Rattlesnake". United States. doi:10.2172/1364492. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1364492.
@article{osti_1364492,
title = {Uncollided Flux Techniques for Discrete-Ordinate Radiation Transport Solutions in Rattlesnake},
author = {Ragusa, Jean C. and DeHart, Mark D.},
abstractNote = {One of the only real-time-resolved measurement tools used at the Transient Test Reactor (TREAT) is the fast-neutron hodoscope. The hodoscope was used for monitoring and measuring fuel motion during a transient pulse. The hodoscope is a line of sight detection and imaging system that provides both temporal and spatial resolution of fuel motion during transients, and in-place measurement of fuel distribution during and after transient experiments. However, the hodoscope relies on fast neutron streaming out of the reactor core, which provides a challenge to transient modeling and simulation. However, use of a first collision source approach can be used to overcome this shortcoming. Hence, the TREAT modeling and simulation team has initiated research to implement such capabilities in the neutron transport code Rattlesnake. This report reviews uncollided flux techniques (first and last collision methods) to be implemented in the Rattlesnake SN code in order to mitigate ray effects in modeling the TREAT reactor+hodoscope system. Angular discretization techniques (SN and PN) for the transport equation are notoriously poor at capturing effectively streaming effects.},
doi = {10.2172/1364492},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share: