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Title: Preliminary Results for the OECD/NEA Time Dependent Benchmark using Rattlesnake, Rattlesnake-IQS and TDKENO

Abstract

One goal of the MAMMOTH M&S project is to validate the analysis capabilities within MAMMOTH. Historical data has shown limited value for validation of full three-dimensional (3D) multi-physics methods. Initial analysis considered the TREAT startup minimum critical core and one of the startup transient tests. At present, validation is focusing on measurements taken during the M8CAL test calibration series. These exercises will valuable in preliminary assessment of the ability of MAMMOTH to perform coupled multi-physics calculations; calculations performed to date are being used to validate the neutron transport solver Rattlesnake\cite{Rattlesnake} and the fuels performance code BISON. Other validation projects outside of TREAT are available for single-physics benchmarking. Because the transient solution capability of Rattlesnake is one of the key attributes that makes it unique for TREAT transient simulations, validation of the transient solution of Rattlesnake using other time dependent kinetics benchmarks has considerable value. The Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has recently developed a computational benchmark for transient simulations. This benchmark considered both two-dimensional (2D) and 3D configurations for a total number of 26 different transients. All are negative reactivity insertions, typically returning to the critical state after some time.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [3]
  1. Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
  2. Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)
  3. Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
1364489
Report Number(s):
INL/EXT-16-39723
TRN: US1702267
DOE Contract Number:
AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; NEA; REACTIVITY INSERTIONS; BENCHMARKS; TRANSIENTS; NEUTRON TRANSPORT; NUCLEAR ENERGY; Benchmark; C5G7; Kinetics; Rattlesnake; TREAT

Citation Formats

DeHart, Mark D., Mausolff, Zander, Weems, Zach, Popp, Dustin, Smith, Kristin, Shriver, Forrest, Goluoglu, Sedat, Prince, Zachary, and Ragusa, Jean. Preliminary Results for the OECD/NEA Time Dependent Benchmark using Rattlesnake, Rattlesnake-IQS and TDKENO. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1364489.
DeHart, Mark D., Mausolff, Zander, Weems, Zach, Popp, Dustin, Smith, Kristin, Shriver, Forrest, Goluoglu, Sedat, Prince, Zachary, & Ragusa, Jean. Preliminary Results for the OECD/NEA Time Dependent Benchmark using Rattlesnake, Rattlesnake-IQS and TDKENO. United States. doi:10.2172/1364489.
DeHart, Mark D., Mausolff, Zander, Weems, Zach, Popp, Dustin, Smith, Kristin, Shriver, Forrest, Goluoglu, Sedat, Prince, Zachary, and Ragusa, Jean. 2016. "Preliminary Results for the OECD/NEA Time Dependent Benchmark using Rattlesnake, Rattlesnake-IQS and TDKENO". United States. doi:10.2172/1364489. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1364489.
@article{osti_1364489,
title = {Preliminary Results for the OECD/NEA Time Dependent Benchmark using Rattlesnake, Rattlesnake-IQS and TDKENO},
author = {DeHart, Mark D. and Mausolff, Zander and Weems, Zach and Popp, Dustin and Smith, Kristin and Shriver, Forrest and Goluoglu, Sedat and Prince, Zachary and Ragusa, Jean},
abstractNote = {One goal of the MAMMOTH M&S project is to validate the analysis capabilities within MAMMOTH. Historical data has shown limited value for validation of full three-dimensional (3D) multi-physics methods. Initial analysis considered the TREAT startup minimum critical core and one of the startup transient tests. At present, validation is focusing on measurements taken during the M8CAL test calibration series. These exercises will valuable in preliminary assessment of the ability of MAMMOTH to perform coupled multi-physics calculations; calculations performed to date are being used to validate the neutron transport solver Rattlesnake\cite{Rattlesnake} and the fuels performance code BISON. Other validation projects outside of TREAT are available for single-physics benchmarking. Because the transient solution capability of Rattlesnake is one of the key attributes that makes it unique for TREAT transient simulations, validation of the transient solution of Rattlesnake using other time dependent kinetics benchmarks has considerable value. The Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has recently developed a computational benchmark for transient simulations. This benchmark considered both two-dimensional (2D) and 3D configurations for a total number of 26 different transients. All are negative reactivity insertions, typically returning to the critical state after some time.},
doi = {10.2172/1364489},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:

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