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Title: Regulatory Risk Reduction for Advanced Reactor Technologies – FY2016 Status and Work Plan Summary

Abstract

Millions of public and private sector dollars have been invested over recent decades to realize greater efficiency, reliability, and the inherent and passive safety offered by advanced nuclear reactor technologies. However, a major challenge in experiencing those benefits resides in the existing U.S. regulatory framework. This framework governs all commercial nuclear plant construction, operations, and safety issues and is highly large light water reactor (LWR) technology centric. The framework must be modernized to effectively deal with non-LWR advanced designs if those designs are to become part of the U.S energy supply. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) Regulatory Risk Reduction (RRR) initiative, managed by the Regulatory Affairs Department at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is establishing a capability that can systematically retire extraneous licensing risks associated with regulatory framework incompatibilities. This capability proposes to rely heavily on the perspectives of the affected regulated community (i.e., commercial advanced reactor designers/vendors and prospective owner/operators) yet remain tuned to assuring public safety and acceptability by regulators responsible for license issuance. The extent to which broad industry perspectives are being incorporated into the proposed framework makes this initiative unique and of potential benefit to all future domestic non-LWR applicants

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
1364483
Report Number(s):
INL/EXT-16-39629
TRN: US1703336
DOE Contract Number:
AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; REACTOR DESIGN; WATER MODERATED REACTORS; WATER COOLED REACTORS; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; REACTOR TECHNOLOGY; HAZARDS; ART; Licensing; light water reactor (LWR); Nuclear Energy Institute’s (NEI); Reactor Regulatory Task Force

Citation Formats

Moe, Wayne Leland. Regulatory Risk Reduction for Advanced Reactor Technologies – FY2016 Status and Work Plan Summary. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1364483.
Moe, Wayne Leland. Regulatory Risk Reduction for Advanced Reactor Technologies – FY2016 Status and Work Plan Summary. United States. doi:10.2172/1364483.
Moe, Wayne Leland. 2016. "Regulatory Risk Reduction for Advanced Reactor Technologies – FY2016 Status and Work Plan Summary". United States. doi:10.2172/1364483. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1364483.
@article{osti_1364483,
title = {Regulatory Risk Reduction for Advanced Reactor Technologies – FY2016 Status and Work Plan Summary},
author = {Moe, Wayne Leland},
abstractNote = {Millions of public and private sector dollars have been invested over recent decades to realize greater efficiency, reliability, and the inherent and passive safety offered by advanced nuclear reactor technologies. However, a major challenge in experiencing those benefits resides in the existing U.S. regulatory framework. This framework governs all commercial nuclear plant construction, operations, and safety issues and is highly large light water reactor (LWR) technology centric. The framework must be modernized to effectively deal with non-LWR advanced designs if those designs are to become part of the U.S energy supply. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) Regulatory Risk Reduction (RRR) initiative, managed by the Regulatory Affairs Department at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is establishing a capability that can systematically retire extraneous licensing risks associated with regulatory framework incompatibilities. This capability proposes to rely heavily on the perspectives of the affected regulated community (i.e., commercial advanced reactor designers/vendors and prospective owner/operators) yet remain tuned to assuring public safety and acceptability by regulators responsible for license issuance. The extent to which broad industry perspectives are being incorporated into the proposed framework makes this initiative unique and of potential benefit to all future domestic non-LWR applicants},
doi = {10.2172/1364483},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:

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