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Title: Gauging the Impact of Various Definitions of Low- and Moderate-Income Communities on Possible Electricity Savings From Weatherization

Abstract

With rising interest in lowering energy costs for low- and moderate-income households, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) asked Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to assess the implications of pursuing energy efficiency neighborhood-by-neighborhood where those households are most prevalent. DOE provided certain scenarios for qualifying geographic areas as “low- and moderate-income communities,” and LBNL used data on demographics, housing types and recent savings from low-income retrofits or weatherization to provide rough electricity savings estimates under those scenarios.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1364437
Report Number(s):
LBNL-1007114
ir:1007114
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION

Citation Formats

Hoffman, Ian M. Gauging the Impact of Various Definitions of Low- and Moderate-Income Communities on Possible Electricity Savings From Weatherization. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1364437.
Hoffman, Ian M. Gauging the Impact of Various Definitions of Low- and Moderate-Income Communities on Possible Electricity Savings From Weatherization. United States. doi:10.2172/1364437.
Hoffman, Ian M. 2017. "Gauging the Impact of Various Definitions of Low- and Moderate-Income Communities on Possible Electricity Savings From Weatherization". United States. doi:10.2172/1364437. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1364437.
@article{osti_1364437,
title = {Gauging the Impact of Various Definitions of Low- and Moderate-Income Communities on Possible Electricity Savings From Weatherization},
author = {Hoffman, Ian M.},
abstractNote = {With rising interest in lowering energy costs for low- and moderate-income households, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) asked Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to assess the implications of pursuing energy efficiency neighborhood-by-neighborhood where those households are most prevalent. DOE provided certain scenarios for qualifying geographic areas as “low- and moderate-income communities,” and LBNL used data on demographics, housing types and recent savings from low-income retrofits or weatherization to provide rough electricity savings estimates under those scenarios.},
doi = {10.2172/1364437},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 6
}

Technical Report:

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  • This study is the latest in a series of evaluations of the Bonneville Power Administration's Residential Weatherization Program (RWP). Data were collected from households weatherized in 1986 under Bonneville's Long Term RWP and from a control group of non-participants. The households selected come from eight different utilities throughout Bonneville's service area. In 1986, 83% of audit-recommended measures were installed by program participants, approximately the same percentage as in previous years. Also as in previous years, the installation rate was higher for recommended measures with greater estimated energy savings. While Bonneville's retrofit costs have remained fairly constant over time, total retrofitmore » costs have increased from $1,700 in 1982 to $2,400 in 1986 (in 1986-$), with the additional costs absorbed by participating households and utilities. Similarly Bonneville's cost per estimated kWh of first-year electricity savings has stayed at about 27 cents/kWh while the average total cost has risen from 28 cents/kWh in 1982 to 44 cents/kWh in 1986 (in 1986-$). For the RWP overall, savings experienced by 1986 participants were substantial. During the first year after weatherization, weighted net savings averaged 2,800 kWh, or 12% of the previous year's energy consumption. In the second post-weatherization year, a weighted average of 2,500 kWh was saved, amounting to 11% of pre-weatherization energy use. Levelized costs were 46 mills per kilowatt hour saved, which is at the low end of the range of cost estimates for a new coal coal plant. Since the 1981 Pilot Program, energy savings have declined and costs have risen. Nevertheless, the energy savings and associated costs of the 1986 Long Term RWP indicate that cost-effective savings can still be achieved by this type of conservation program. 28 refs., 8 figs., 19 tabs.« less
  • To ensure proper assessment of its weatherization activities, the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) has examined several cohorts of participants in various phases of its Long-Term Residential Weatherization Program (Long-Term RWP). Beginning in 1980, energy savings one, two, and three years after program participation have been evaluated. This study, which continues the series of Bonneville's ongoing evaluation of weatherization activities, examines electricity savings three years after weatherization in the 1986 Long-Term RWP. Electricity bills were weather-adjusted using the Princeton Scorekeeping Method (PRISM). Normalized Annual Consumption (NAC) was calculated for each participant and control household for which data were available. Gross energymore » savings were calculated by subtracting a household's NAC for each postretrofit year (1986--87, 1986--88, and 1988--89) from its preretrofit NAC (1985--86). Household level data were aggregated and examined at the utility level allowing the calculation of average net savings, which is the difference between gross savings by nonparticipants and participants. Utility-level data were then weighted, based on the extent of each utility's participation in the Long-Term RWP in 1986, to allow the identification of overall program savings. 29 refs., 5 figs., 14 tabs.« less
  • The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is interested in assessing the potential economic impacts of its portfolio of subprograms on national employment and income. A special purpose version of the IMPLAN input-output model called ImBuild II is used in this study of 20 subprograms of the Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program contained in the EERE final FY 2005 budget request to the Office of Management and Budget on February 2, 2004. Energy savings, investments, and impacts on U.S. national employment and earned income are reported by subprogram for selected years to the year 2030.more » Energy savings and investments from these subprograms have the potential of creating a total of 228,000 jobs and about $3.1 billion in earned income (2003$) by the year 2030.« less
  • The Bonneville Power Administration operated an interim Residential Weatherization Program during 1982 and 1983 throughout the Pacific Northwest region of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and western Montana. The program offered free home energy audits and financial incentives (usually cash rebates) to help pay for installation of recommended retrofit measures in electrically-heated homes. Almost 104 thousand homes were retrofit during the two years the program operated at a cost to BPA of almost $160 million. The purpose of this study is to analyze actual electricity savings for homes that participated in the BPA program. We examine the electricity savings achieved by thesemore » homes and the relationships between actual and predicted savings. In addition, we examine those households with anomalously large and anomalously small (negative) electricity savings. These data are viewed in several ways. First, we develop overall summary statistics, then we compare the characteristics of large and small saver homes in terms of demographic, structure, and retrofit characteristics. Finally, we develop simple regression models that explain variations across households in actual electricity savings. These analyses are conducted separately for the 1982 and 1983 participants.« less
  • The BPA program offered free home enrgy audits to identify cost-effective conservation measures to reduce space and water heating electricity use. The program also offered zero-interest, deferred-payment loans for installation of measures recommended during the audit. The data analyzed here, available for about 250 homes that received both an audit and a loan between April 1 and October 1, 1981, include actual electricity consumption records for a heating season before retrofit (1980/81) and a heating season after retrofit (1981/82). In addition, daily temperature data for relevant weather stations, energy audit reports, weatherization completion forms, and information from a telephone surveymore » on household demographic and structure characteristics are also available. Thus, the data set encompasses information related to actual electricity savings, audit predictions of that saving, actual retrofit costs for the measures installed, and information on several factors related to household electricity use and savings. The actual reduction in annual electricity use averages 4130 kWh across the participant households. The cost of the retrofits that yielded this saving averaged $2100. The median ratio of actual-to-estimated saving is 0.66. Thus, on average, two-thirds of the expected saving is actually realized. However, there is substantial variation in this ratio. Actual electricity use increases in the second year for more than 10% of these homes. On the other hand, actual savings are more than double the audit estimates in more than 10% of the homes.« less